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Author (up) Andrade-Oliveira, V.; Amano, M.T.; Correa-Costa, M.; Castoldi, A.; Felizardo, R.J.; de Almeida, D.C.; Bassi, E.J.; Moraes-Vieira, P.M.; Hiyane, M.I.; Rodas, A.C.; Peron, J.P.; Aguiar, C.F.; Reis, M.A.; Ribeiro, W.R.; Valduga, C.J.; Curi, R.; Vinolo, M.A.; Ferreira, C.M.; Câmara, N.O. url  openurl
  Title Gut Bacteria Products Prevent AKI Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Am Soc Nephrol  
  Volume 26 Issue 8 Pages 1877-1888  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are fermentation end products produced by the intestinal microbiota and have anti-inflammatory and histone deacetylase-inhibiting properties. Recently, a dual relationship between the intestine and kidneys has been unraveled. Therefore, we evaluated the role of SCFA in an AKI model in which the inflammatory process has a detrimental role. We observed that therapy with the three main SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) improved renal dysfunction caused by injury. This protection was associated with low levels of local and systemic inflammation, oxidative cellular stress, cell infiltration/activation, and apoptosis. However, it was also associated with an increase in autophagy. Moreover, SCFAs inhibited histone deacetylase activity and modulated the expression levels of enzymes involved in chromatin modification. In vitro analyses showed that SCFAs modulated the inflammatory process, decreasing the maturation of dendritic cells and inhibiting the capacity of these cells to induce CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation. Furthermore, SCFAs ameliorated the effects of hypoxia in kidney epithelial cells by improving mitochondrial biogenesis. Notably, mice treated with acetate-producing bacteria also had better outcomes after AKI. Thus, we demonstrate that SCFAs improve organ function and viability after an injury through modulation of the inflammatory process, most likely via epigenetic modification.  
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  ISSN 1046-6673 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45839  
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