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Author Devenny, D.A.; Wegiel, J.; Schupf, N.; Jenkins, E.; Zigman, W.; Krinsky-Mchale, W.P.; Silverman, W.P. openurl 
  Title (up) Type Journal Article
  Year Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UC @ neuromama @ ref2 Serial 930  
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Author Devenny, D.A.; Wegiel, J.; Schupf, N.; Jenkins, E.; Zigman, W.; Krinsky-Mchale, W.P.; Silverman, W.P. openurl 
  Title (up) Type Journal Article
  Year Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UC @ neuromama @ ref2 Serial 933  
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Author Bossong, B. and isbn  openurl
  Title (up) Type Book Chapter
  Year 1989 Publication Disengagement and test anxiety as defensive strategies, and performance Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 117-130  
  Keywords discusses the use of high test anxiety as a defensive mechanism, proposing that it can have a beneficial effect on performance;*Academic Achievement;*Test Anxiety;College Students;High School Students;Academic Failure;*Defense Mechanisms  
  Abstract (from the book) discusses a . . . linkage between test anxiety and performance: test anxiety can by used by the person as an anticipatory defense explanation for potential failure / it provides the subject with a plausible failure attribution and this way prevents her/him from employing the extremely costly strategy of disengagement / leads to the conclusion . . . that awareness of high test anxiety can have a beneficial effect on performance (from the chapter) this line of thought was tested in two experiments [first with 96 14-year old high school students and second with 66 college students] by varying the availability of test anxiety as a defensive a priori explanation for potential failure and measuring the performance at number reasoning tasks of moderate to high difficulty (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved) Classification Code: Academic Learning & Achievement [3550] Population Group: Human Format Covered: Print Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research Update Date: 19910101  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Swets & Zeitlinger Publishers Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 90-265-1029-2 (hardcover) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number DUKE @ macjys @ Bossong:DisengagementAndTestAnxietyAsDefensiveStrategies:1989 Serial 2764  
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Author Heckhausen, J. and isbn  openurl
  Title (up) Type Book Chapter
  Year 2000 Publication Developmental regulation across the life span: An action-phase model of engagement and disengagement with developmental goals Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 213-231  
  Keywords Motivation;action-phase model;*Human Development;*Goals;*Self Management;development regulation;goal pursuit;lifespan  
  Abstract (from the chapter) Proposes an action-theoretical conception of developmental regulation. This conception integrates the life-span theory of control (Heckhausen, 1999a; Hechhausen and Schulz, 1995; Schulz and Heckhausen, 1996) with the Rubicon model of action phases (Heckhausen, 1991; Heckhausen and Gollwitzer, 1987). According to this conception, individuals’ attempts to regulate their own development are organized in terms of engaging with or disengaging from developmental goals. Thus, developmental regulation is structured in phases of action representing increasing levels of engagement with a goal, and then disengagement when the goal no longer seems attainable. This focus on specific developmental goals allows the individual to invest resources selectively in a specific goal pursuit for a particular period of his or her life time rather than spreading resources thinly among too many goals pursued simultaneously. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved) Classification Code: Psychosocial & Personality Development [2840] Format Covered: Print Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research Update Date: 20020130  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-444-50601-2 (hardcover) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number DUKE @ macjys @ Heckhausen:DevelopmentalRegulationAcrossTheLifeSpanAn:2000 Serial 3031  
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Author Heckhausen, J.; and Schulz, R. isbn  openurl
  Title (up) Type Book Chapter
  Year 1998 Publication Developmental regulation in adulthood: Selection and compensation via primary and secondary control Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 50-77  
  Keywords developmental regulation & life-span theory & model of control & successful aging in adulthood;*Human Development;Models;Theories;*Self Control;*Self Management;*Aging  
  Abstract (from the chapter) A life-span theory of control (J. Heckhausen and R. Schulz, 1995) is presented along with a set of empirical findings on the theory’s implications for developmental regulation. This theory is extended and specified with regard to phenomena involved in individuals’ attempts to regulate their own development, thus outlining a life-span model of successful aging. The chapter presents findings from 4 studies that demonstrate the scope and limits of developmental regulation in adults at different ages in contrasting socioeconomic life ecologies. Moreover, empirical support for the feasibility and usefulness of identifying strategies of developmental regulation and a regulatory process of developmental optimization is discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved) Classification Code: Developmental Psychology [2800] Population Group: Human Format Covered: Print Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research Conference Information: Life-Span Perspectives on Motivation and Control, Jul, 1995, Max Planck Inst for Human Development, Berlin, Germany Update Date: 19990101  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Cambridge University Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-521-59176-7 (hardcover) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number DUKE @ macjys @ Heckhausen:DevelopmentalRegulationInAdulthoodSelectionAndCompensation:1998 Serial 3032  
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Author Higgins, E.T. openurl 
  Title (up) Type Book Chapter
  Year Publication The “Information Transmission” and “Communication Game” models : implications for speaker-listener processes Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number DUKE @ macjys @ Higgins:TheInformationTransmissionAndCommunicationGameModels: Serial 3090  
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Author Hockey, G.R.J. and isbn  openurl
  Title (up) Type Book Chapter
  Year 1996 Publication Energetical-control processes in the regulation of human performance Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 271-287  
  Keywords action theory & cognitive energetic-control processes in routine & effort regulation of human performance under stress;*Energy Expenditure;Cognitive Processes;*Stress Reactions;*Performance;Coping Behavior  
  Abstract (from the chapter) analyses human performance within the frameworks of action theory and cognitive energetics / a 2-loop model of regulatory control is introduced which distinguishes between (lower-level) routine and (higher-level) effort regulation / the model explains performance changes under stress, expecially performance protection strategies, by adjustments in effort expenditure / it is argued that stable performance under stress is due to compensatory activities such as reduced attention to secondary tasks and strategic adjustments / [suggests that] research should . . . be more concerned about overall system efficiency than about single task effectiveness (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved) Classification Code: Personality Traits & Processes [3120] Population Group: Human Format Covered: Print Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research Update Date: 19970101  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Pabst Science Publishers Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 3-931660-11-7 (paperback) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number DUKE @ macjys @ Hockey:EnergeticalControlProcessesInTheRegulationOfHuman:1996 Serial 3096  
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Author Klinger, E.; and Cox, W.M. and isbn  openurl
  Title (up) Type Book Chapter
  Year 2004 Publication The Motivational Structure Questionnaire and Personal Concerns Inventory: Psychometric Properties Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 177-197  
  Keywords Motivation;*Inventories;*Psychometrics;psychometric properties;test reliability;*Personality Measures;Personal Concerns Inventory;*Test Construction;Motivational Structure Questionnaire;Attitudes;*Questionnaires;factor structure;test validity  
  Abstract (from the chapter) This chapter presents the psychometric properties of the Motivational Structure Questionnaire (MSQ; Cox & Klinger, Chapter 8, this volume; Klinger, Cox, & Blount, 1995) and Personal Concerns Inventory (PCI; Cox & Klinger, 2000b), with a focus on their reliability, factor structure, and validity. These closely related instruments are designed unconventionally in an idiothetic format, in that respondents first list idiographically recorded goals and then rate these goals along quantitative dimensions that permit deriving nomothetic scores. Their test-retest and internal-consistency reliability have been established with a variety of participant groups, including both individuals in clinical treatment and others drawn from universities and communities. Although the stability of these measures is variable because the goals with which they start are changeable, the internal consistency of their scales is within conventionally acceptable limits. The validity of these measures has been established by relating participants’ responses on the questionnaire to a wide variety of other, independent measures of their motivational patterns. These have included measures from the following domains: (a) physiological and cognitive processes (e.g., from skin-conductance responses to attentional biases for concern-related stimuli), (b) mental processes (e.g., the content of thoughts and dreams), (c) life style (e.g., participants’ daily activities), (d) workers’ characteristics (e.g., employee satisfaction and work patterns in industrial settings), (e) various personality measures, and (f) treatment outcome (e.g., symptom remission and psychological functioning one-year post-treatment). This chapter reviews this research, which has demonstrated that the MSQ is a reliable, valid, and useful psychological assessment device. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved) Classification Code: Personality Scales & Inventories [2223] Classification Code: Personality Traits & Processes [3120] Population Group: Human Format Covered: Print Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research Test & Measures: Motivational Structure Questionnaire Test & Measures: Personal Concerns Inventory Update Date: 20050613  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-470-84517-1 (hardcover) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number DUKE @ macjys @ Klinger:TheMotivationalStructureQuestionnaireAndPersonalConcerns:2004 Serial 3132  
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Author Koole, S.L.; and Kuhl, J.; Jostmann, N.B.; Finkenauer, C.; and, and isbn  openurl
  Title (up) Type Book Chapter
  Year 2006 Publication Self-Regulation in Interpersonal Relationships: The Case of Action versus State Orientation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 360-383  
  Keywords *Social Influences;action state orientation;self regulation;disposition;*Personality Processes;*Personality;*Self Regulation;change prevention;social influences;change promotion;interpersonal relationships;*Interpersonal Relationships  
  Abstract (from the chapter) Self-regulation can be defined as the set of psychological processes through which people bring their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors in line with abstract standards, goals, or values (Baumeister, Heatherton, & Tice, 1993; Kuhl & Koole, 2004). In recent years, psychologists have developed a variety of different models and metaphors to try to explain how self-regulation works. Prevailing models and metaphors of self-regulation, despite their differences, have at least one thing in common: They portray self-regulation as a private process that predominantly takes place within the individual psyche. In everyday life, however, complete privacy is the exception rather than the rule. Self-regulation therefore often serves important interpersonal functions. The interface between self-regulation and interpersonal relationships did not receive much research attention until fairly recently. Currently, a growing number of studies have found that interpersonal relationships shape the person’s capacity for self-regulation (Diamond & Aspinwall, 2003; Finkenauer, Engels, & Baumeister, 2005; Kuhl, 2000; Mikulincer, Shaver, & Pereg, 2003; Wegner & Erber, 1993). Conversely, it is becoming increasingly apparent that self-regulation is a key moderator of people’s behavior in interpersonal relationships (Finkel & Campbell, 2001). In the present chapter, we aim to shed more light on the interface between self-regulation and interpersonal relationships. Our discussion focuses particularly on the notion of action versus state orientation (Kuhl, 1981, 1984). Action orientation refers to a meta-static, or change-promoting, mode of control during which self-regulation is facilitated. State orientation refers to a cata-static, or change-preventing, mode of control, during which self-regulation is inhibited. The notion of action versus state orientation has inspired considerable theory and research over the last few decades. In the present chapter, we build on this work to analyze the mutual dependence between self-regulation and interpersonal relationships. In what follows, we start by considering the notion of action versus state orientation in more detail. We then discuss how dispositions toward action versus state orientation are shaped, triggered, and manifested in the context of interpersonal relationships. We end with our main conclusions and possibilities for future research and applications on the crossroads between self-regulation and interpersonal relationships. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved) Classification Code: Personality Traits & Processes [3120] Classification Code: Social Psychology [3000] Population Group: Human Format Covered: Print Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research Update Date: 20060710  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Guilford Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 1-59385-271-1 (hardcover) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number DUKE @ macjys @ Koole:SelfRegulationInInterpersonalRelationshipsTheCaseOf:2006 Serial 3133  
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Author Lang, F.R.; and,; Heckhausen, J. and isbn  openurl
  Title (up) Type Book Chapter
  Year 2006 Publication Motivation and Interpersonal Regulation Across Adulthood: Managing the Challenges and Constraints of Social Contexts Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 149-166  
  Keywords *Motivation;motivation;*Adult Development;interpersonal regulation;Social Influences;social context;*Biology;adaptation;influences;biology;*Adult Learning;*Interpersonal Relationships;learning  
  Abstract (from the chapter) In this chapter, we address how biology and societal constraints influence the development of motivational resources and the ways in which efforts to regulate one’s social world contribute to adaptation and effective action potentials. We discuss the ways in which motivational processes and interpersonal regulation enhance and protect the adult’s capacity to learn skills and strategies of control over development so that they stimulate and regulate further adaptive developmental action. We divide our chapter into three sections. The first section discusses the ways that biological influences and societal opportunities create challenges and constraints with respect to the individual’s capacity to effectively shape and organize social environments. In the second section, we consider processes and strategies of developmental regulation across adulthood from the perspective of the life span theory of control (Heckhausen & Schulz, 1995). In the third and last section we discuss the role and potential of individual agency in regulating personal relationships across adulthood. We conceive of such interpersonal regulation as involving both responses to (unexpected or uncontrollable) contextual change (e.g., widowhood, an accident, a severe disease), as well as the adult’s purposeful, goal-related activity in selecting, manipulating, maintaining, or breaking his or her social relationships (Lang, Reschke, & Never, in press). Often, changes in the social context (e.g., marriage, parenthood, moving to a new town, retirement) involve and reflect active efforts of the individual to adaptively mold the social context in accordance with his or her capabilities and needs and to do so to protect motivational resources for future action. We begin with a discussion of how biological (e.g., sensory) and societal (e.g., normative) limitations challenge the adult’s potentials of organizing and regulating the social environment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved) Classification Code: Developmental Psychology [2800] Population Group: Human Format Covered: Print Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research Update Date: 20060828  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford University Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-19-517190-X (hardcover) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number DUKE @ macjys @ Lang:MotivationAndInterpersonalRegulationAcrossAdulthoodManaging:2006 Serial 3153  
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