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Author Geborek, P.; Crnkic, M.; Petersson, I.F.; Saxne, T. url  openurl
  Title Etanercept, infliximab, and leflunomide in established rheumatoid arthritis: clinical experience using a structured follow up programme in southern Sweden Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal Ann.Rheum.Dis  
  Volume 61 Issue 9 Pages 793-798  
  Keywords adverse effects; analysis; antagonists & inhibitors; Anti-Inflammatory Agents; Anti-Inflammatory Agents,Non-Steroidal; Antibodies; Antibodies,Monoclonal; Antirheumatic Agents; Arthritis; Arthritis,Rheumatoid; Chi-Square Distribution; Clinical Protocols; Clinical Trials; drug therapy; Feasibility Studies; Female; Health; Humans; Immunoglobulin G; immunology; Isoxazoles; Male; methods; Methotrexate; Middle Aged; Monitoring,Physiologic; pathology; Patients; Product Surveillance,Postmarketing; Prospective Studies; Pyrimidines; Receptors,Tumor Necrosis Factor; Sweden; therapeutic use; Treatment Outcome; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; World Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of prospectively monitoring treatment efficacy and tolerability of infliximab, etanercept, and leflunomide over a two year period in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice using a structured protocol. METHODS: All patients with RA at seven centres in southern Sweden, for whom at least two disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, including methotrexate, had failed or not been tolerated, who started treatment with either infliximab, etanercept, or leflunomide were included. They were evaluated at predefined times using a standardised protocol including items required for evaluating response to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or EULAR criteria. All adverse events were recorded using World Health Organisation terminology. Concomitant treatment and survival while receiving a drug were recorded. RESULTS: During the study 166 patients were treated with etanercept, 135 with infliximab, and 103 with leflunomide. Treatment response as determined by the ACR and EULAR response criteria was similar for the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. The TNF blockers performed significantly better than leflunomide both as determined by the response criteria and by survival on drug analysis. Thus 79% and 75% continued to receive etanercept or infliximab compared with 22% of patients who started leflunomide after 20 months. The spectrum of side effects did not differ from those previously reported in the clinical trials. The initial two year experience of a protocol for postmarketing surveillance of etanercept, infliximab, and leflunomide shows that a structured protocol with central data handling can be used in clinical practice for documenting the performance of newly introduced drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Efficacy data for the TNF blockers comply with results in clinical trials, whereas leflunomide appeared to perform worse than in clinical trials. Prolonged monitoring is required to identify possible rare side effects  
  Address Department of Rheumatology, Lund University Hospital, S-221 85 Lund, Sweden. pierre.geborek@reum.lu.se  
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  Notes DA – 20020814 IS – 0003-4967 (Print) LA – eng PT – Comparative Study PT – Journal Article PT – Multicenter Study RN – 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal) RN – 0 (Antibodies, Monoclonal) RN – 0 (Antirheumatic Agents) RN – 0 (Immunoglobulin G) RN – 0 (Isoxazoles) RN – 0 (Pyrimidines) RN – 0 (Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor) RN – 0 (Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha) RN – 0 (infliximab) RN – 185243-69-0 (TNFR-Fc fusion protein) RN – 75706-12-6 (leflunomide) SB – IM Approved no  
  Call Number 54 Serial 843  
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Author Leardini, G.; Salaffi, F.; Montanelli, R.; Gerzeli, S.; Canesi, B. url  openurl
  Title A multicenter cost-of-illness study on rheumatoid arthritis in Italy Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal Clin Exp.Rheumatol.  
  Volume 20 Issue 4 Pages 505-515  
  Keywords Adult; analysis; Arthritis; Arthritis,Rheumatoid; Cost of Illness; Costs and Cost Analysis; Disease Progression; economics; Female; Health; Health Care Costs; Health Services Research; Health Status; Humans; Italy; Male; methods; Middle Aged; Patients; physiopathology; Quality of Life; Questionnaires; Research Support; Retrospective Studies  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and disabling disease frequently leading to physical and psychological dependence, with considerable economic consequences. The aim of our study was to perform a cost-of-illness analysis for RA according to the four different levels of functional RA severity. METHODS: Direct costs (hospitalisations, treatments, diagnostics and the non-medical costs), indirect costs (productivity losses and informal care), and intangible costs (deterioration in the quality of life of patients, their families and friends assessed by the Medical Outcome Survey Short Form and the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire) were measured in 200 RA patients. RESULTS: The social costs--direct plus indirect costs--increased as RA worsened. The direct costs increase very significantly (p < 0.0005) among the four functional classes (respectively Euro 1643.4 – 2910.2 – 4236.5 – 5696.8), likewise the indirect costs (respectively Euro 2704.9 – 9566.4 – 12183.1 – 17249.2). Moreover social costs, analysed independently from the functional classes, are significantly higher in patients with other concomitant diseases. As far as the intangible costs are concerned, for all the areas explored by the scales used, the high impact of RA on the quality of life of RA patients was markedly evident. Female gender and co-morbidity are associated with higher costs. CONCLUSIONS: In Italy, the indirect costs account for the highest cost for management of RA patients. Considering that costs increase with RA progression, the patients who show a rapid evolution of the functional damages should be identified early based on risk indicators  
  Address Division of Rheumatology, Azienda ULSS12, Venice, Italy. leardini@shineline.it  
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  Notes DA – 20020814 IS – 0392-856X (Print) LA – eng PT – Journal Article PT – Multicenter Study PT – Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't SB – IM Approved no  
  Call Number 52 Serial 861  
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Author Genovese, M.C.; Bathon, J.M.; Martin, R.W.; Fleischmann, R.M.; Tesser, J.R.; Schiff, M.H.; Keystone, E.C.; Wasko, M.C.; Moreland, L.W.; Weaver, A.L.; Markenson, J.; Cannon, G.W.; Spencer-Green, G.; Finck, B.K. url  openurl
  Title Etanercept versus methotrexate in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: two-year radiographic and clinical outcomes Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal Arthritis Rheum.  
  Volume 46 Issue 6 Pages 1443-1450  
  Keywords administration & dosage; Adult; adverse effects; Aged; Aged,80 and over; Antirheumatic Agents; Arthritis; Arthritis,Rheumatoid; Disability Evaluation; Disease Progression; Double-Blind Method; drug therapy; Female; Health; Humans; Immunoglobulin G; immunology; Male; methods; Methotrexate; Middle Aged; Patient Dropouts; Patients; radiography; Receptors,Tumor Necrosis Factor; Research Support; Safety; therapy; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who received monotherapy with either etanercept or methotrexate (MTX) for 2 years and to assess the safety of this therapy. METHODS: In the Enbrel ERA (early rheumatoid arthritis) trial, 632 patients with early, active RA were randomized to receive either twice-weekly subcutaneous etanercept (10 mg or 25 mg) or weekly oral MTX (mean dosage 19 mg per week) for at least 1 year in a double-blind manner. Following the blinded phase of the trial, 512 patients continued to receive the therapy to which they had been randomized for up to 1 additional year, in an open-label manner. Radiograph readers remained blinded to treatment group assignment and the chronologic order of images. RESULTS: At 24 months, more 25-mg etanercept patients than MTX patients met American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (72% and 59%, respectively; P = 0.005), and more had no increase in total score and erosion scores on the Sharp scale (P = 0.017 and P = 0.012, respectively). The mean changes in total Sharp score and erosion score in the 25-mg etanercept group (1.3 and 0.66 units, respectively) were significantly lower than those in the MTX group (3.2 and 1.86 units, respectively; P = 0.001). Significantly more patients in the 25-mg etanercept group (55%) than in the MTX group (37%) had at least 0.5 units of improvement in the Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index (P < 0.001). Fewer patients in the etanercept group than in the MTX group experienced adverse events or discontinued treatment because of adverse events. CONCLUSION: Etanercept as monotherapy was safe and was superior to MTX in reducing disease activity, arresting structural damage, and decreasing disability over 2 years in patients with early, aggressive RA  
  Address Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1000 Welch Road #203, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. genovese@stanford.edu  
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  Notes DA – 20020712 IS – 0004-3591 (Print) LA – eng PT – Clinical Trial PT – Comparative Study PT – Journal Article PT – Randomized Controlled Trial PT – Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't RN – 0 (Antirheumatic Agents) RN – 0 (Immunoglobulin G) RN – 0 (Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor) RN – 185243-69-0 (TNFR-Fc fusion protein) RN – 59-05-2 (Methotrexate) SB – AIM SB – IM Approved no  
  Call Number 66 Serial 845  
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Author Symmons, D.; Turner, G.; Webb, R.; Asten, P.; Barrett, E.; Lunt, M.; Scott, D.; Silman, A. url  openurl
  Title The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis in the United Kingdom: new estimates for a new century Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal Rheumatology (Oxford)  
  Volume 41 Issue 7 Pages 793-800  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Arthritis; Arthritis,Rheumatoid; classification; epidemiology; Female; Great Britain; Humans; Incidence; Male; methods; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Questionnaires; Random Allocation; Research Support; Sex Distribution  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: It is 40 yr since the last age- and sex-specific estimates of the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for the UK were published. Since then the classification criteria for RA have been revised and there has been evidence of a fall in the incidence of RA, especially in women. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the age- and sex-specific point prevalence of RA (defined as fulfilment of a modification of the 1987 ACR classification criteria for RA on the day of assessment). The estimate was made in the primary care setting in Norfolk, UK. METHODS: A stratified random sample was drawn from seven age and gender bands. The 7050 individuals selected were mailed a screening questionnaire. Positive responders were invited to attend for a clinical examination. The sample was matched against the names in the Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR), a register of incident cases of inflammatory polyarthritis which has been in existence since 1990. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 82%. Sixty-six cases of RA were identified. Extrapolated to the population of the UK, the overall minimum prevalence of RA is 1.16% in women and 0.44% in men. A number of incident cases of RA previously notified to NOAR were not identified as cases in the survey because they had entered into treatment-induced remission. In addition, some cases who failed to attend for examination had significant disability. These prevalence figures are therefore an underestimate. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of RA in women, but not in men, in the UK may have fallen since the 1950s  
  Address ARC Epidemiology Unit, Stopford Building, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, UK  
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  Notes DA – 20020703 IS – 1462-0324 (Print) LA – eng PT – Journal Article PT – Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't SB – AIM SB – IM Approved no  
  Call Number 6 Serial 907  
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Author Choi, H.K.; Seeger, J.D.; Kuntz, K.M. url  openurl
  Title A cost effectiveness analysis of treatment options for methotrexate-naive rheumatoid arthritis Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Rheumatol.  
  Volume 29 Issue 6 Pages 1156-1165  
  Keywords administration & dosage; analysis; Analysis of Variance; Arthritis; Arthritis,Rheumatoid; Boston; Cohort Studies; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Decision Making; drug therapy; economics; Female; Humans; Immunoglobulin G; Isoxazoles; Male; Massachusetts; methods; Methotrexate; Pain Measurement; Patients; Probability; Prospective Studies; Receptors,Tumor Necrosis Factor; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sulfasalazine; therapy; Treatment Outcome; United States  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: New treatment options for patients with methotrexate (MTX)-naive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have become available. Given wide variability in efficacy and cost among different treatment options, we sought to determine their relative cost effectiveness to help guide policy in different cost constrained settings. METHODS: We performed a cost effectiveness analysis comparing 5 monotherapy options for patients with MTX-naive RA: (1) etanercept, (2) leflunomide, (3) MTX (up to 15 mg weekly), (4) sulfasalazine (SSZ), and (5) no second line agent. A decision analysis model was used with a time horizon of 6 months. We employed 2 measures of effectiveness based on published clinical trial data: American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20% response proportion (ACR 20) and a weighted average of proportions achieving ACR 70, ACR 50, and ACR 20 (ACR 70 weighted response, ACR 70WR). Incremental cost effectiveness ratios were calculated as additional cost per patient achieving either outcome, compared with the next most expensive option. RESULTS: In both base case analyses employing ACR 20 and ACR 70WR as effectiveness measures, MTX and SSZ both cost less and were more effective (i.e., cost saving) than no second line agent. Leflunomide cost more and was less efficacious than SSZ (dominated) in analyses using either outcome. The most efficacious option, etanercept, cost US $41,900 per ACR 20 and $40,800 per ACR 70 WR compared with SSZ and MTX, respectively. When we included only direct costs in analyses, the least expensive non-dominated option was SSZ with incremental cost effectiveness ratios of US $900 per ACR 20 and $1500 per ACR 70WR compared with no second line agent. Overall, relative cost effectiveness between MTX and SSZ was sensitive to variation in relevant variables in sensitivity analyses. Otherwise, our extensive sensitivity analyses did not substantially affect the base case results. CONCLUSION: MTX is cost effective (cost saving vs the no second line agent option) for MTX-naive RA in achieving ACR 20 or ACR 70WR over a 6 month period. Based on available data, the relative cost effectiveness between SSZ and MTX cannot be determined with reasonable certainty and SSZ therapy appears to be as cost effective as MTX (cost saving) in achieving ACR outcomes over a 6 month period. The most efficacious option, etanercept, incurs much higher incremental costs per ACR 20 or ACR 70WR than other options analyzed. Whether etanercept compared with MTX is cost effective depends on whether > $40,000 per ACR 20 or ACR 70WR over a 6 month period is considered acceptable  
  Address Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02114, USA. HCHOI@PARTNERS.ORG  
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  Notes DA – 20020614 IS – 0315-162X (Print) LA – eng PT – Comparative Study PT – Journal Article RN – 0 (Immunoglobulin G) RN – 0 (Isoxazoles) RN – 0 (Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor) RN – 185243-69-0 (TNFR-Fc fusion protein) RN – 59-05-2 (Methotrexate) RN – 599-79-1 (Sulfasalazine) RN – 75706-12-6 (leflunomide) SB – IM Approved no  
  Call Number 67 Serial 819  
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Author Cohen, S.; Hurd, E.; Cush, J.; Schiff, M.; Weinblatt, M.E.; Moreland, L.W.; Kremer, J.; Bear, M.B.; Rich, W.J.; McCabe, D. url  openurl
  Title Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with anakinra, a recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, in combination with methotrexate: results of a twenty-four-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal Arthritis Rheum.  
  Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 614-624  
  Keywords administration & dosage; adverse effects; analysis; Antibodies; Antirheumatic Agents; Arthritis; Arthritis,Rheumatoid; Blood Sedimentation; Dose-Response Relationship,Drug; Double-Blind Method; drug therapy; Drug Therapy,Combination; Female; Humans; immunology; Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein; Interleukin-1; Male; methods; Methotrexate; Middle Aged; Patients; physiopathology; Recombinant Proteins; Research Support; Safety; Severity of Illness Index; Sialoglycoproteins; therapeutic use; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of anakinra in combination with methotrexate (MTX) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Patients with moderate-to-severe active RA who were receiving MTX for 6 consecutive months, with stable doses for > or = 3 months (those with disease duration of >6 months but <12 years) were randomized into 6 groups: placebo or 0.04, 0.1, 0.4, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg of anakinra administered in a single, daily, subcutaneous injection. The primary efficacy end point was the proportion of subjects who met the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (attained an ACR20 response) at week 12. RESULTS: A total of 419 patients were randomized in the study. Patient demographics and disease status were similar in the 6 treatment groups. The ACR20 responses at week 12 in the 5 active treatment plus MTX groups demonstrated a statistically significant (P = 0.001) dose-response relationship compared with the ACR20 response in the placebo plus MTX group. The ACR20 response rate in the anakinra 1.0-mg/kg (46%; P = 0.001) and 2.0-mg/kg (38%; P = 0.007) dose groups was significantly greater than that in the placebo group (19%). The ACR20 responses at 24 weeks were consistent with those at 12 weeks. Similar improvements in anakinra-treated subjects were noted in individual ACR components, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, onset of ACR20 response, sustainability of ACR20 response, and magnitude of ACR response. Anakinra was safe and well tolerated. Injection site reaction was the most frequently noted adverse event, and this led to premature study withdrawal in 7% (1.0-mg/kg group) to 10% (2.0-mg/kg group) of patients receiving higher doses. CONCLUSION: In patients with persistently active RA, the combination of anakinra and MTX was safe and well tolerated and provided significantly greater clinical benefit than MTX alone  
  Address Department of Rheumatology, St. Paul Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235, USA. stanleycohen@radiantresearch.com  
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  Notes DA – 20020328 IS – 0004-3591 (Print) LA – eng PT – Clinical Trial PT – Journal Article PT – Multicenter Study PT – Randomized Controlled Trial PT – Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't RN – 0 (Antibodies) RN – 0 (Antirheumatic Agents) RN – 0 (IL1RN protein, human) RN – 0 (Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein) RN – 0 (Recombinant Proteins) RN – 0 (Sialoglycoproteins) RN – 59-05-2 (Methotrexate) SB – AIM SB – IM Approved no  
  Call Number 76 Serial 821  
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Author Aspray, T.J.; Unwin, N. url  openurl
  Title Diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal Adv.Exp.Med.Biol.  
  Volume 498 Issue Pages 21-26  
  Keywords Adult; Africa South of the Sahara; Cameroon; Cost of Illness; Diabetes Mellitus; economics; epidemiology; Health; Humans; Life Style; Prevalence; Research Support; Tanzania; therapy; World Health  
  Abstract NCDs including diabetes, heart disease and stroke are global epidemics of the 21st century. The greatest burden on health will be in developing countries and sub-Saharan Africa is an area of major challenge: We are concerned with planning for the adult victims of the new epidemic and this includes the development of appropriate treatment. Therapy should be cost effective and evidence on the economics of treating chronic conditions in Africa is urgently required. Finally, health promotion, primary prevention and health screening strategies for chronic diseases such as diabetes, stroke and coronary heart disease are required  
  Address Department of Medicine, The Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK  
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  Notes DA – 20020319 IS – 0065-2598 (Print) LA – eng PT – Journal Article PT – Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't SB – IM Approved no  
  Call Number 41 Serial 802  
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Author Archenholtz, B.; Nordborg, E.; Bremell, T. url  openurl
  Title Lower level of education in young adults with arthritis starting in the early adulthood Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal Scand.J Rheumatol.  
  Volume 30 Issue 6 Pages 353-355  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Age Distribution; Age of Onset; Arthritis; Arthritis,Rheumatoid; Career Choice; Case-Control Studies; Cohort Studies; diagnosis; Educational Status; epidemiology; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Probability; Reference Values; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Distribution; Sweden  
  Abstract An appropriate education may lead to less work disability in patients with arthritis. The aim of the study was to determine the educational level in two groups of young adults with arthritis. Patients with juvenile arthritis ( JA, n=32) and patients with early adult onset of arthritis (EA, n=47) were examined with the Quality of Life Scale (QOLS) and a questionnaire concerning education and profession counselling. Comparisons with a reference group (n=95) from the general population were made. The EA group had lower level of education (p<0.01), compared to the reference group. Among the EA patients, 62% had not discussed their choice of occupation with anybody, compared to 19% in the JA group. The educational level was lower in patients with rheumatic disease starting in early adulthood. Educational issues and counselling should be focused on the care of young adults with arthritis  
  Address Department of Rheumatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goteborg Sweden. birgitha.archenholtz@vgregion.se  
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  Notes DA – 20020215 IS – 0300-9742 (Print) LA – eng PT – Comparative Study PT – Journal Article PT – Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't SB – IM Approved no  
  Call Number 3 Serial 797  
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Author Visser, H.; le Cessie, S.; Vos, K.; Breedveld, F.C.; Hazes, J.M. url  openurl
  Title How to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis early: a prediction model for persistent (erosive) arthritis Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal Arthritis Rheum.  
  Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 357-365  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged,80 and over; analysis; Antibodies; Area Under Curve; Arthritis; Arthritis,Rheumatoid; blood; Child; classification; diagnosis; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Genetic Screening; genetics; Humans; Joints; Logistic Models; Male; methods; Middle Aged; Netherlands; Pain; Patients; Physical Examination; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Prospective Studies; Research Support; Rheumatoid Factor; Rheumatology  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To develop a clinical model for the prediction, at the first visit, of 3 forms of arthritis outcome: self-limiting, persistent nonerosive, and persistent erosive arthritis. METHODS: A standardized diagnostic evaluation was performed on 524 consecutive, newly referred patients with early arthritis. Potentially diagnostic determinants obtained at the first visit from the patient's history, physical examination, and blood and imaging testing were entered in a logistic regression analysis. Arthritis outcome was recorded at 2 years' followup. The discriminative ability of the model was expressed as a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC). RESULTS: The developed prediction model consisted of 7 variables: symptom duration at first visit, morning stiffness for > or =1 hour, arthritis in > or =3 joints, bilateral compression pain in the metatarsophalangeal joints, rheumatoid factor positivity, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody positivity, and the presence of erosions (hands/feet). Application of the model to an individual patient resulted in 3 clinically relevant predictive values: one for self-limiting arthritis, one for persistent nonerosive arthritis, and one for persistent erosive arthritis. The ROC AUC of the model was 0.84 (SE 0.02) for discrimination between self-limiting and persistent arthritis, and 0.91 (SE 0.02) for discrimination between persistent nonerosive and persistent erosive arthritis, whereas the discriminative ability of the American College of Rheumatology 1987 classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis was significantly lower, with ROC AUC values of 0.78 (SE 0.02) and 0.79 (SE 0.03), respectively. CONCLUSION: A clinical prediction model was developed with an excellent ability to discriminate, at the first visit, between 3 forms of arthritis outcome. Validation in other early arthritis clinics is necessary  
  Address Department of Rheumatology, C4-R, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands  
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  Notes DA – 20020212 IS – 0004-3591 (Print) LA – eng PT – Clinical Trial PT – Journal Article PT – Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't SB – AIM SB – IM Approved no  
  Call Number 146 Serial 916  
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Author url  openurl
  Title Guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis: 2002 Update Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal Arthritis Rheum.  
  Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 328-346  
  Keywords Antirheumatic Agents; Arthritis,Rheumatoid; diagnosis; drug therapy; Humans; therapeutic use  
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  Address American College of Rheumatology, 1800 Century Place, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, USA  
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  Notes DA – 20020212 Approved no  
  Call Number 2 Serial 793  
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