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Author Ramachandra, T.V.; Bharath, A.H.; Sowmyashree, M.V. url  openurl
  Title Monitoring urbanization and its implications in a mega city from space: Spatiotemporal patterns and its indicators Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Management  
  Volume 148 Issue Pages 67-81  
  Keywords Delhi; Remote sensing; Spatial metrics; Urbanization; Urban sprawl  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43048  
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Author Lagendijk, D.D.G.; Thaker, M.; de Boer, W.F.; Page, B.R.; Prins, H.H.T.; Slotow, R. url  openurl
  Title Change in Mesoherbivore Browsing Is Mediated by Elephant and Hillslope Position Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal PLoS ONE  
  Volume 10 Issue 6 Pages e0128340  
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  Abstract Elephant are considered major drivers of ecosystems, but their effects within small-scale landscape features and on other herbivores still remain unclear. Elephant impact on vegetation has been widely studied in areas where elephant have been present for many years. We therefore examined the combined effect of short-term elephant presence (< 4 years) and hillslope position on tree species assemblages, resource availability, browsing intensity and soil properties. Short-term elephant presence did not affect woody species assemblages, but did affect height distribution, with greater sapling densities in elephant access areas. Overall tree and stem densities were also not affected by elephant. By contrast, slope position affected woody species assemblages, but not height distributions and densities. Variation in species assemblages was statistically best explained by levels of total cations, Zinc, sand and clay. Although elephant and mesoherbivore browsing intensities were unaffected by slope position, we found lower mesoherbivore browsing intensity on crests with high elephant browsing intensity. Thus, elephant appear to indirectly facilitate the survival of saplings, via the displacement of mesoherbivores, providing a window of opportunity for saplings to grow into taller trees. In the short-term, effects of elephant can be minor and in the opposite direction of expectation. In addition, such behavioural displacement promotes recruitment of saplings into larger height classes. The interaction between slope position and elephant effect found here is in contrast with other studies, and illustrates the importance of examining ecosystem complexity as a function of variation in species presence and topography. The absence of a direct effect of elephant on vegetation, but the presence of an effect on mesoherbivore browsing, is relevant for conservation areas especially where both herbivore groups are actively managed.  
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  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43051  
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Author Naniwadekar, R.; Mishra, C.; Isvaran, K.; Madhusudan, M.D.; Datta, A. url  openurl
  Title Looking beyond parks: the conservation value of unprotected areas for hornbills in Arunachal Pradesh, Eastern Himalaya Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Oryx  
  Volume 49 Issue 2 Pages 303-311  
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  Abstract AbstractThe loss of tropical forests and associated biodiversity is a global concern. Conservation efforts in tropical countries such as India have mostly focused on state-administered protected areas despite the existence of vast tracts of forest outside these areas. We studied hornbills (Bucerotidae), an ecologically important vertebrate group and a flagship for tropical forest conservation, to assess the importance of forests outside protected areas in Arunachal Pradesh, north-east India. We conducted a state-wide survey to record encounters with hornbills in seven protected areas, six state-managed reserved forests and six community-managed unclassed forests. We estimated the density of hornbills in one protected area, four reserved forests and two unclassed forests in eastern Arunachal Pradesh. The state-wide survey showed that the mean rate of encounter of rufous-necked hornbills Aceros nipalensis was four times higher in protected areas than in reserved forests and 22 times higher in protected areas than in unclassed forests. The mean rate of encounter of wreathed hornbills Rhyticeros undulatus was twice as high in protected areas as in reserved forests and eight times higher in protected areas than in unclassed forests. The densities of rufous-necked hornbill were higher inside protected areas, whereas the densities of great hornbill Buceros bicornis and wreathed hornbill were similar inside and outside protected areas. Key informant surveys revealed possible extirpation of some hornbill species at sites in two protected areas and three unclassed forests. These results highlight a paradoxical situation where individual populations of hornbills are being lost even in some legally protected habitat, whereas they continue to persist over most of the landscape. Better protection within protected areas and creative community-based conservation efforts elsewhere are necessary to maintain hornbill populations in this biodiversity-rich region.  
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  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43054  
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Author Karanth, P.K. openurl 
  Title An island called India: phylogenetic patterns across multiple taxonomic groups reveal endemic radiations Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Current Science  
  Volume 108 Issue 10 Pages 1847-1851  
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  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43063  
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Author Sekar, S.; Karanth, K.P. doi  openurl
  Title Does size matter? Comparative population genetics of two butterflies with different wingspans Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Organisms Diversity & Evolution  
  Volume 15 Issue 3 Pages 567-575  
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  Abstract The dispersal ability of a species is central to its biology, affecting other processes like local adaptation, population and community dynamics, and genetic structure. Among the intrinsic, species-specific factors that affect dispersal ability in butterflies, wingspan was recently shown to explain a high amount of variance in dispersal ability. In this study, a comparative approach was adopted to test whether a difference in wingspan translates into a difference in population genetic structure. Two closely related butterfly species from subfamily Satyrinae, family Nymphalidae, which are similar with respect to all traits that affect dispersal ability except for wingspan, were studied. Melanitis leda (wingspan 60–80 mm) and Ypthima baldus (wingspan 30–40 mm) were collected from the same areas along the Western Ghats of southern India. Amplified fragment length polymorphisms were used to test whether the species with a higher wingspan (M. leda) exhibited a more homogenous population genetic structure, as compared to a species with a shorter wingspan (Y. baldus). In all analyses, Y. baldus exhibited greater degree of population genetic structuring. This study is one of the few adopting a comparative approach to establish the relationship between traits that affect dispersal ability and population genetic structure.  
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  ISSN 1618-1077 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43064  
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Author Agarwal, I.; Karanth, K.P. url  openurl
  Title A phylogeny of the only ground-dwelling radiation of Cyrtodactylus (Squamata, Gekkonidae): diversification of Geckoella across peninsular India and Sri Lanka Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution  
  Volume 82, Part A Issue Pages 193-199  
  Keywords Aridification; cryptic species; historical biogeography; Mid-Miocene climatic optimum  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1055-7903 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43068  
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Author Ranganathan, Y.; Bessière, J.-M.; Borges, R.M. url  openurl
  Title A coat of many scents: Cuticular hydrocarbons in multitrophic interactions of fig wasps with ants Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acta Oecologica  
  Volume 67 Issue Pages 24-33  
  Keywords Alkanes; Alkenes; Chemical camouflage; Ficus racemosa; Polyenes; Prey recognition  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43074  
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Author Slik, J.W.F.; Arroyo-Rodríguez, V.; Aiba, S.-I.; Alvarez-Loayza, P.; Alves, L.F.; Ashton, P.; Balvanera, P.; Bastian, M.L.; Bellingham, P.J.; van den Berg, E.; Bernacci, L.; da Conceição Bispo, P.; Blanc, L.; Böhning-Gaese, K.; Boeckx, P.; Bongers, F.; Boyle, B.; Bradford, M.; Brearley, F.Q.; Breuer-Ndoundou Hockemba, M.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Calderado Leal Matos, D.; Castillo-Santiago, M.; Catharino, E.L.M.; Chai, S.-L.; Chen, Y.; Colwell, R.K.; Chazdon, R.L.; Clark, C.; Clark, D.B.; Clark, D.A.; Culmsee, H.; Damas, K.; Dattaraja, H.S.; Dauby, G.; Davidar, P.; DeWalt, S.J.; Doucet, J.-L.; Duque, A.; Durigan, G.; Eichhorn, K.A.O.; Eisenlohr, P.V.; Eler, E.; Ewango, C.; Farwig, N.; Feeley, K.J.; Ferreira, L.; Field, R.; de Oliveira Filho, A.T.; Fletcher, C.; Forshed, O.; Franco, G.; Fredriksson, G.; Gillespie, T.; Gillet, J.-F.; Amarnath, G.; Griffith, D.M.; Grogan, J.; Gunatilleke, N.; Harris, D.; Harrison, R.; Hector, A.; Homeier, J.; Imai, N.; Itoh, A.; Jansen, P.A.; Joly, C.A.; de Jong, B.H.J.; Kartawinata, K.; Kearsley, E.; Kelly, D.L.; Kenfack, D.; Kessler, M.; Kitayama, K.; Kooyman, R.; Larney, E.; Laumonier, Y.; Laurance, S.; Laurance, W.F.; Lawes, M.J.; Amaral, I.L. do; Letcher, S.G.; Lindsell, J.; Lu, X.; Mansor, A.; Marjokorpi, A.; Martin, E.H.; Meilby, H.; Melo, F.P.L.; Metcalfe, D.J.; Medjibe, V.P.; Metzger, J.P.; Millet, J.; Mohandass, D.; Montero, J.C.; de Morisson Valeriano, M.; Mugerwa, B.; Nagamasu, H.; Nilus, R.; Ochoa-Gaona, S.; Onrizal; Page, N.; Parolin, P.; Parren, M.; Parthasarathy, N.; Paudel, E.; Permana, A.; Piedade, M.T.F.; Pitman, N.C.A.; Poorter, L.; Poulsen, A.D.; Poulsen, J.; Powers, J.; Prasad, R.C.; Puyravaud, J.-P.; Razafimahaimodison, J.-C.; Reitsma, J.; dos Santos, J.R.; Roberto Spironello, W.; Romero-Saltos, H.; Rovero, F.; Rozak, A.H.; Ruokolainen, K.; Rutishauser, E.; Saiter, F.; Saner, P.; Santos, B.A.; Santos, F.; Sarker, S.K.; Satdichanh, M.; Schmitt, C.B.; Schöngart, J.; Schulze, M.; Suganuma, M.S.; Sheil, D.; da Silva Pinheiro, E.; Sist, P.; Stevart, T.; Sukumar, R.; Sun, I.-F.; Sunderland, T.; Suresh, H.S.; Suzuki, E.; Tabarelli, M.; Tang, J.; Targhetta, N.; Theilade, I.; Thomas, D.W.; Tchouto, P.; Hurtado, J.; Valencia, R.; van Valkenburg, J.L.C.H.; Van Do, T.; Vasquez, R.; Verbeeck, H.; Adekunle, V.; Vieira, S.A.; Webb, C.O.; Whitfeld, T.; Wich, S.A.; Williams, J.; Wittmann, F.; Wöll, H.; Yang, X.; Adou Yao, C.Y.; Yap, S.L.; Yoneda, T.; Zahawi, R.A.; Zakaria, R.; Zang, R.; de Assis, R.L.; Garcia Luize, B.; Venticinque, E.M. url  openurl
  Title An estimate of the number of tropical tree species Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  
  Volume 112 Issue 24 Pages 7472-7477  
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  Abstract The high species richness of tropical forests has long been recognized, yet there remains substantial uncertainty regarding the actual number of tropical tree species. Using a pantropical tree inventory database from closed canopy forests, consisting of 657,630 trees belonging to 11,371 species, we use a fitted value of Fisher’s alpha and an approximate pantropical stem total to estimate the minimum number of tropical forest tree species to fall between ∼40,000 and ∼53,000, i.e., at the high end of previous estimates. Contrary to common assumption, the Indo-Pacific region was found to be as species-rich as the Neotropics, with both regions having a minimum of ∼19,000–25,000 tree species. Continental Africa is relatively depauperate with a minimum of ∼4,500–6,000 tree species. Very few species are shared among the African, American, and the Indo-Pacific regions. We provide a methodological framework for estimating species richness in trees that may help refine species richness estimates of tree-dependent taxa.  
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  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43105  
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Author Datta-Roy, A.; Deepak, V.; Sidharthan, C.; Barley, A.J.; Praveen, K. openurl 
  Title An addition to the endemic Indian radiation of Eutropis: Phylogenetic position of Eutropis dissimilis Hallowell (Squamata: Scincidae) Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Zootaxa  
  Volume 4027 Issue 1 Pages 145-150  
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  ISSN 1175-5334 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43106  
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Author Krishnan, A.; Ghara, M.; Kasinathan, S.; Pramanik, G.K.; Revadi, S.; Borges, R.M. doi  openurl
  Title Plant reproductive traits mediate tritrophic feedback effects within an obligate brood-site pollination mutualism Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Oecologia  
  Volume 179 Issue 3 Pages 797-809  
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  Abstract Plants, herbivores and parasitoids affect each other directly and indirectly; however, feedback effects mediated by host plant traits have rarely been demonstrated in these tritrophic interactions. Brood-site pollination mutualisms (e.g. those involving figs and fig wasps) represent specialised tritrophic communities where the progeny of mutualistic pollinators and of non-mutualistic gallers (both herbivores) together with that of their parasitoids develop within enclosed inflorescences called syconia (hence termed brood-sites or microcosms). Plant reproductive phenology (which affects temporal brood-site availability) and inflorescence size (representing brood-site size) are plant traits that could affect reproductive resources, and hence relationships between trees, pollinators and non-pollinating wasps. Analysing wasp and seed contents of syconia, we examined direct, indirect, trophic and non-trophic relationships within the interaction web of the fig–fig wasp community of Ficus racemosa in the context of brood site size and availability. We demonstrate that in addition to direct resource competition and predator–prey (host–parasitoid) interactions, these communities display exploitative or apparent competition and trait-mediated indirect interactions. Inflorescence size and plant reproductive phenology impacted plant–herbivore and plant–parasitoid associations. These plant traits also influenced herbivore–herbivore and herbivore–parasitoid relationships via indirect effects. Most importantly, we found a reciprocal effect between within-tree reproductive asynchrony and fig wasp progeny abundances per syconium that drives a positive feedback cycle within the system. The impact of a multitrophic feedback cycle within a community built around a mutualistic core highlights the need for a holistic view of plant–herbivore–parasitoid interactions in the community ecology of mutualisms.  
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  ISSN 1432-1939 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43113  
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