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Author Abduev, A.; Akmedov, A.; Asvarov, A.; Chiolerio, A. url  openurl
  Title A revised growth model for transparent conducting Ga doped ZnO films: Improving crystallinity by means of buffer layers Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Plasma Processes and Polymers  
  Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages 725-733  
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  Notes Cited By :3; Export Date: 2 November 2016 Approved no  
  Call Number IIT-CSF @ alessandro.chiolerio @ Serial 42780  
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Author Adomdza, G.K. doi  openurl
  Title Choosing Between a Student-Run and Professionally Managed Venture Accelerator Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice Abbreviated Journal Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice  
  Volume Issue Pages n/a-n/a  
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  Abstract This case presents challenges facing a student-run venture accelerator at a major university in the United States. The student-run model has attracted much media attention for its uniqueness, but it has also raised questions about its sustainability. Signals from a new dean, not invested in the student model, are putting much pressure on the student-chief executive officer to change course—to tweak the student-run model and fight for its future or cave in to pressures to “professionalize” it and let students take a backseat in management. The case highlights challenges in entrepreneurial leadership of a student-run accelerator at the point of initial growth.  
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  ISSN 1540-6520 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number ATM @ robstephens13 @ Serial 41235  
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Author Agarwal, I.; Karanth, K.P. url  openurl
  Title A phylogeny of the only ground-dwelling radiation of Cyrtodactylus (Squamata, Gekkonidae): diversification of Geckoella across peninsular India and Sri Lanka Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution  
  Volume 82, Part A Issue Pages 193-199  
  Keywords Aridification; cryptic species; historical biogeography; Mid-Miocene climatic optimum  
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  ISSN 1055-7903 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43068  
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Author Allison, T.H.; Davis, B.C.; Short, J.C.; Webb, J.W. doi  openurl
  Title Crowdfunding in a Prosocial Microlending Environment: Examining the Role of Intrinsic Versus Extrinsic Cues Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice Abbreviated Journal Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice  
  Volume 39 Issue 1 Pages 53-73  
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  Abstract Microloans garnered from crowdfunding provide an important source of financial capital for nascent entrepreneurs. Drawing on cognitive evaluation theory, we assess how linguistic cues known to affect underlying motivation can frame entrepreneurial narratives either as a business opportunity or as an opportunity to help others. We examine how this framing affects fundraising outcomes in the context of prosocial lending and conduct our analysis on a sample of microloans made to over 36,000 entrepreneurs in 51 countries via an online crowdfunding platform. We find that lenders respond positively to narratives highlighting the venture as an opportunity to help others, and less positively when the narrative is framed as a business opportunity.  
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  ISSN 1540-6520 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number ATM @ robstephens13 @ Serial 41433  
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Author Anderson-Teixeira, K.J.; Davies, S.J.; Bennett, A.C.; Gonzalez-Akre, E.B.; Muller-Landau, H.C.; Joseph Wright, S.; Abu Salim, K.; Almeyda Zambrano, A.M.; Alonso, A.; Baltzer, J.L.; Basset, Y.; Bourg, N.A.; Broadbent, E.N.; Brockelman, W.Y.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Burslem, D.F.R.P.; Butt, N.; Cao, M.; Cardenas, D.; Chuyong, G.B.; Clay, K.; Cordell, S.; Dattaraja, H.S.; Deng, X.; Detto, M.; Du, X.; Duque, A.; Erikson, D.L.; Ewango, C.E.N.; Fischer, G.A.; Fletcher, C.; Foster, R.B.; Giardina, C.P.; Gilbert, G.S.; Gunatilleke, N.; Gunatilleke, S.; Hao, Z.; Hargrove, W.W.; Hart, T.B.; Hau, B.C.H.; He, F.; Hoffman, F.M.; Howe, R.W.; Hubbell, S.P.; Inman-Narahari, F.M.; Jansen, P.A.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, D.J.; Kanzaki, M.; Kassim, A.R.; Kenfack, D.; Kibet, S.; Kinnaird, M.F.; Korte, L.; Kral, K.; Kumar, J.; Larson, A.J.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Liu, S.; Lum, S.K.Y.; Lutz, J.A.; Ma, K.; Maddalena, D.M.; Makana, J.-R.; Malhi, Y.; Marthews, T.; Mat Serudin, R.; McMahon, S.M.; McShea, W.J.; Memiaghe, H.R.; Mi, X.; Mizuno, T.; Morecroft, M.; Myers, J.A.; Novotny, V.; de Oliveira, A.A.; Ong, P.S.; Orwig, D.A.; Ostertag, R.; den Ouden, J.; Parker, G.G.; Phillips, R.P.; Sack, L.; Sainge, M.N.; Sang, W.; Sri-ngernyuang, K.; Sukumar, R.; Sun, I.-F.; Sungpalee, W.; Suresh, H.S.; Tan, S.; Thomas, S.C.; Thomas, D.W.; Thompson, J.; Turner, B.L.; Uriarte, M.; Valencia, R.; Vallejo, M.I.; Vicentini, A.; Vrška, T.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.; Weiblen, G.; Wolf, A.; Xu, H.; Yap, S.; Zimmerman, J. doi  openurl
  Title CTFS-ForestGEO: a worldwide network monitoring forests in an era of global change Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Global Change Biology  
  Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages 528-549  
  Keywords biodiversity; Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS); climate change; demography; forest dynamics plot; Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO); long-term monitoring; spatial analysis  
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  ISSN 1365-2486 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43015  
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Author Armour, C.; Hansen, M. url  doi
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  Title Assessing DSM-5 latent subtypes of acute stress disorder dissociative or intrusive? Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Psychiatry Research Abbreviated Journal Psychiatry Res  
  Volume 225 Issue 3 Pages 476-483  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; *Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; Dissociative Disorders/classification/*diagnosis/psychology; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Risk Factors; Social Support; Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/classification/*diagnosis/psychology; ASD subtypes; Dissociative ASD; Intrusive ASD; Latent profile analysis; Risk factors  
  Abstract Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) was first included in the DSM-IV in 1994. It was proposed to account for traumatic responding in the early post trauma phase and to act as an identifier for later Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Unlike PTSD it included a number of dissociative indicators. The revised DSM-5 PTSD criterion included a dissociative-PTSD subtype. The current study assessed if a dissociative-ASD subtype may be present for DSM-5 ASD. Moreover, we assessed if a number of risk factors resulted in an increased probability of membership in symptomatic compared to a baseline ASD profile. We used data from 450 bank robbery victims. Latent profile analysis (LPA) was used to uncover latent profiles of ASD. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine if female gender, age, social support, peritraumatic panic, somatization, and number of trauma exposures increased or decreased the probability of profile membership. Four latent profiles were uncovered and included an intrusion rather than dissociative subtype. Increased age and social support decreased the probability of individuals being grouped into the intrusion subtype whereas increased peritraumatic panic and somatization increased the probability of individuals being grouped into the intrusion subtype. Findings are discussed in regard to the ICD-11 and the DSM-5.  
  Address National Centre for Psychotraumatology, Institute for Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-1781 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:25535010 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42196  
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Author Arregle, J.-L.; Batjargal, B.; Hitt, M.A.; Webb, J.W.; Miller, T.; Tsui, A.S. doi  openurl
  Title Family Ties in Entrepreneurs' Social Networks and New Venture Growth Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice Abbreviated Journal Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice  
  Volume 39 Issue 2 Pages 313-344  
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  Abstract Family ties are an important conduit of resources for entrepreneurs, but both positive and negative outcomes can arise. Building upon a family embeddedness perspective, we develop hypotheses about curvilinear relationships between the proportion of family ties in entrepreneurs' networks and venture growth. We test them on entrepreneurs from China, France, Russia, and the United States. These effects appear to be related to the type of entrepreneurs' social network (business advice, emotional support, and business resources). Our results confirm effects specific to each network: an inverted U-shape for advice and emotional support networks but a U-shape for the business resource network, measuring what proportion of kin in each entrepreneurial network type is valuable to or, conversely, undermines new venture growth.  
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  ISSN 1540-6520 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number ATM @ robstephens13 @ Serial 41609  
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Author Ashalakshmi, N.C.; Nag, K.S.C.; Karanth, K.P. doi  openurl
  Title Molecules support morphology: species status of South Indian populations of the widely distributed Hanuman langur Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Conservation Genetics  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 43-58  
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  Abstract The taxonomy of the Hanuman langur (Semnopithecus spp.), a widely distributed Asian colobine monkey, has been in a flux for a long time due to much disagreement between various classification schemes. However, results from a recent field-based morphological study were consistent with Hill’s (Ceylon J Sci 21:277–305, 1939) species level classification scheme. Here we tested the validity of S. hypoleucos and S. priam, the two South Indian species recognized by Hill. To this end, one mitochondrial and four nuclear markers were sequenced from over 72 non-invasive samples of Hanuman langurs and S. johnii collected from across India. The molecular data were subjected to various tree building methods. The nuclear data was also used in a Bayesian structure analysis and to determine the genealogical sorting index of each hypothesized species. Results from nuclear data suggest that the South Indian population of Hanuman langur consists of two units that correspond to the species recognized by Hill. However in the mitochondrial tree S. johnii and S. priam were polyphyletic probably due to retention of ancestral polymorphism and/or low levels of hybridization. Implications of these results on conservation of Hanuman langurs are also discussed.  
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  ISSN 1572-9737 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 42966  
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Author Auxemery, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title [Clinical forms of post-traumatic depression] Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication L'Encephale Abbreviated Journal Encephale  
  Volume 41 Issue 4 Pages 346-354  
  Keywords Deuil post-traumatique; Deuil traumatique; Depression masquee; Depression post-traumatique; Depression traumatique; Post-concussive syndrome; Posttraumatic depression; Posttraumatic grief; Psychic trauma; Psychopathologie; Psychopathology; Psychopharmacologie; Psychopharmacology; Syndrome post-commotionnel; Traumatic depression; Traumatic grief; Traumatisme psychique  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: As a result of determinants specific to the psychopathological structure of the psychological trauma, psycho-traumatised patients very rarely solicit the health care system directly with a request for treatment centred on their trauma. The medical profession is consulted for non-specific symptoms and complications, which are mainly somatoform, addictions and depressive disorders. After a few epidemiological reminders followed by a discussion concerning contemporary depressive and post-traumatic nosographic features, we define, through our clinical experience collated with the data in the literature, different clinical and etiopathogenic contexts of post-traumatic depression in order to control their therapeutic treatment. CLINICAL FINDINGS: Burnout post-traumatic depression in response to re-experiencing is the most common: it is a reactive psycho-physiological burnout in response to the emotional distress re-experienced during flashbacks, insomnia, a constant feeling of insecurity and the deleterious consequences of this symptomatology in terms of social adaptation. A common genetic predisposition affecting serotoninergic regulation seems to be a vulnerability marker of both depressive and psychotraumatic symptoms. In this case, SSRI will be effective on sadness. In addition, these antidepressants have been widely prescribed for the first-line treatment of depressive and psychotraumatic symptoms. However, this pharmacological class is often insufficient in relieving autonomic hyperactivity such as re-experiencing which are mediated more by noradrenergic hyperactivity. SNRI such as venlafaxine can be used as a first-line treatment. Post-traumatic depression with psychotic features congruent with mood is dominated by a feeling of incurability; the subject blames himself and feels guilty about the traumatic event and its consequences. Symptoms of denial of identity are sometimes observed: confined by an intense depersonalization, the psycho-traumatised subject evokes that he is “no longer himself” and that his mind “is disconnected”. Confronted with the psychological emptiness of the traumatic scene, the psycho-traumatised subject remains devoid of thought as if their mind has left him. In addition to antidepressant therapy, an atypical antipsychotic drug must be prescribed to relieve the melancholic symptoms as well as the concomitant psychotraumatic symptoms. Post-traumatic depression masked by peripheral physical injuries is the result of accidents combining psychological and physical impairment. The physical pain resulting from the accident regularly recalls the drama in the same way as traumatic re-experiencing. Depression masked by this somatic suffering is difficult to diagnose, but the repeated somatic complaints at the forefront of the request for treatment, the breakdown of self-esteem as well as the level of subjective strain due to pain and dysesthesia are all indications. The psychotherapy will focus on the symbolic reconstruction of the organs that have been damaged or destroyed, with the aim of healing the extensive narcissistic impairment. Post-concussive depression is diagnosed following a head trauma, however severe. It is sometimes assigned to neurological lesions and at other times recognised as the expression of a purely psychological reaction. Antidepressant therapy, or possibly trial therapy, is often indicated. The terms traumatic grief and post-traumatic grief are often used synonymously in publications: a conceptual opposition must however been recalled. If the traumatic grief is the result of the loss of an object that holds much psychological importance for the individual, the subject has not however been traumatised by this event and is not suffering and will not suffer from re-experiencing. The therapy will include methods used in the psychotherapeutic treatment of grief; antidepressants are often insufficient. Differently, post-traumatic grief takes shape when the loss of another is concomitant with the confrontation with the reality of the death witnessed in a moment of peri-traumatic dissociation. This grief is often observed following the discovery of the body of a close friend or family member who has committed suicide, or when part of a family has been decimated by an accident whilst the survivors watch their close relations die pending the arrival of the emergency services, or when a military comrade is wounded in combat in front of his partner. The mourning process cannot really begin until the flashbacks cease. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical depression or even melancholia, possibly masked by somatic or post-concussive complaints, is often the initial mode of contact with the health care system for the psycho-traumatised subject. The different clinical and etiopathogenic contexts of post-traumatic depression that we have developed in this work use specific therapies which need to be clarified by further research based on this nosography.  
  Address Service medical de psychologie clinique appliquee a l'aeronautique, hopital d'instruction des Armees Percy, 101, avenue Henri-Barbusse, BP406, 92141 Clamart, France. Electronic address: yann.auxemery@hotmail.fr  
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  Language French Summary Language Original Title Formes cliniques des depressions post-traumatiques  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-7006 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:25238908 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42198  
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Author Émond, K.; Sainte-Marie, B.; Galbraith, P.S.; Bêty, J. url  openurl
  Title Top-down vs. bottom-up drivers of recruitment in a key marine invertebrate: Investigating early life stages of snow crab Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal ICES Journal of Marine Science  
  Volume 72 Issue 5 Pages 1336-1348  
  Keywords cannibalism; climate; groundfish predation; larval production; population dynamics; recruitment; snow crab  
  Abstract Many snow crab fisheries have fluctuated widely over time in a quasi-cyclic way due to highly variable recruitment. The causes of this variability are still debated. Bottom-up processes related to climate variability may strongly affect growth and survival during early life, whereas top-down predator effects may be a major source of juvenile mortality. Moreover, intrinsic density-dependent processes, which have received much less attention, are hypothetically responsible for the cycles in recruitment. This study explored how climate, larval production, intercohort cannibalism and groundfish predation may have affected recruitment of early juvenile snow crab in the northwest Gulf of St Lawrence (eastern Canada) over a period of 23 years. Abundance of early juvenile snow crabs (2.5-22.9 mm in carapace width), representing the first 3 years of benthic life, came from an annual trawl survey and was used to determine cohort strength. Analyses revealed a cyclic pattern in abundance of 0+ crabs that may arise from cohort resonant effects. This pattern consisted of three recruitment pulses but was reduced to two pulses by age 2+, while the interannual variability of cohort strength was dampened. This reconfiguration of the earliest recruitment pattern was dictated primarily by bottom water temperature and cannibalism, which progressively overruled the pre-settlement factors of larval production and surface water temperature that best explained abundance of 0+ crabs. The results strongly suggest that bottom-up and density-dependent processes prevail over top-down control in setting the long-term trends and higher-frequency oscillations of snow crab early recruitment patterns. © 2015 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.  
  Address Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Maurice Lamontagne Institute, 850 Route de la Mer, Mont-Joli, QC, Canada  
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  Notes Export Date: 17 March 2016 Approved no  
  Call Number McgGll @ elizabethburgess @ Serial 42532  
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