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Author Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar; Branton, Alice; Trivedi, Dahryn; Nayak, Gopal; Mishra, Rakesh; Jana, Snehasis url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of Biofield Treated Date Palm Callus Initiation Medium Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Nutrition and Food Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 4 Issue 6 Pages (down) 660-668  
  Keywords Biofield Energy Treatment; Date Palm Callus Initiation Medium; X-ray Diffraction; Thermal Analysis; Particle Size Analysis; Surface Area Analysis  
  Abstract The date palm is mainly cultivated for the production of sweet fruit. Date palm callus initiation medium (DPCIM) is used for plant tissue culture applications. The present work is intended to evaluate the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment on physical, thermal and spectral properties of the DPCIM. The control and treated DPCIM were evaluated by various analytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, particle size analyzer (PSA), surface area analyzer and ultra violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) analysis. The XRD analysis revealed a decrease in intensity of XRD peaks of the treated sample as compared to the control. The crystallite size of the treated DPCIM (81.02 nm) was decreased with respect to the control sample (84.99 nm). The DSC analysis showed a slight decrease in melting temperature of the treated sample. Additionally, the latent heat of fusion of treated sample was changed by 45.66% as compared to the control sample. The TGA analysis showed an increase in onset degradation temperature of the treated sample (182ºC) as compared to the control sample (142ºC). This indicated the increase in thermal stability of the treated DPCIM. PSA results demonstrated an increase in average particle size (d50) and size showed by 99% of particles (d99) by 19.2 and 40.4%, respectively as compared to the control sample. The surface area analyzer showed a decrease in surface area of treated DPCIM by 13.4%, which was well supported by the particle size results. UV spectra of the treated sample showed the disappearance of absorption peak 261 nm in treated sample as compared to the control. Overall, the result showed that biofield energy treatment has a paramount influence on physical, thermal and spectral properties of DPCIM. Therefore, it is assumed that biofield treated DPCIM could be used as a better medium for plant tissue culture applications.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Science Publishing Group Place of Publication United States Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of Biofield Treated Date Palm Callus Initiation Medium  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2327-2694 (Print) 2327-2716 (Online) ISBN Medium  
  Area Biotechnology Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved yes  
  Call Number Trivedi Global Inc. @ gopal @ Serial 43430  
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Author Daniel, J.A.; Chau, N.; Abdel-Hamid, M.K.; Hu, L.; von Kleist, L.; Whiting, A.; Krishnan, S.; Maamary, P.; Joseph, S.R.; Simpson, F.; Haucke, V.; McCluskey, A.; Robinson, P.J. url  openurl
  Title Phenothiazine-derived antipsychotic drugs inhibit dynamin and clathrin-mediated endocytosis Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Traffic  
  Volume 16 Issue 6 Pages (down) 635-654  
  Keywords JHU, CME, drug  
  Abstract Chlorpromazine is a phenothiazine-derived antipsychotic drug (APD) that inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in cells by an unknown mechanism. We examined whether its action and that of other APDs might be mediated by the GTPase activity of dynamin. Eight of eight phenothiazine-derived APDs inhibited dynamin I (dynI) in the 2-12 µm range, the most potent being trifluoperazine (IC50 2.6 ± 0.7 µm). They also inhibited dynamin II (dynII) at similar concentrations. Typical and atypical APDs not based on the phenothiazine scaffold were 8- to 10-fold less potent (haloperidol and clozapine) or were inactive (droperidol, olanzapine and risperidone). Kinetic analysis showed that phenothiazine-derived APDs were lipid competitive, while haloperidol was uncompetitive with lipid. Accordingly, phenothiazine-derived APDs inhibited dynI GTPase activity stimulated by lipids but not by various SH3 domains. All dynamin-active APDs also inhibited transferrin (Tfn) CME in cells at related potencies. Structure-activity relationships (SAR) revealed dynamin inhibition to be conferred by a substituent group containing a terminal tertiary amino group at the N2 position. Chlorpromazine was previously proposed to target AP-2 recruitment in the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCV). However, neither chlorpromazine nor thioridazine affected AP-2 interaction with amphiphysin or clathrin. Super-resolution microscopy revealed that chlorpromazine blocks neither clathrin recruitment by AP-2, nor AP-2 recruitment, showing that CME inhibition occurs downstream of CCV formation. Overall, potent dynamin inhibition is a shared characteristic of phenothiazine-derived APDs, but not other typical or atypical APDs, and the data indicate that dynamin is their likely in-cell target in endocytosis.  
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  ISSN 1600-0854 1398-9219 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes drug interactions with CME Approved no  
  Call Number AG @ matthewjvarga @ Serial 46779  
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Author Ng, A.; Barker, N. url  openurl
  Title Ovary and fimbrial stem cells: biology, niche and cancer origins Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol  
  Volume 16 Issue 10 Pages (down) 625-638  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The mammalian ovary is covered by a single-layered epithelium that undergoes rupture and remodelling following each ovulation. Although resident stem cells are presumed to be crucial for this cyclic regeneration, their identity and mode of action have been elusive. Surrogate stemness assays and in vivo fate-mapping studies using recently discovered stem cell markers have identified stem cell pools in the ovary and fimbria that ensure epithelial homeostasis. Recent findings provide insights into intrinsic mechanisms and local extrinsic cues that govern the function of ovarian and fimbrial stem cells. These discoveries have advanced our understanding of stem cell biology in the ovary and fimbria, and lay the foundations for evaluating the contribution of resident stem cells to the initiation and progression of human epithelial ovarian cancer.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 44935  
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Author Al-Nouri, Z.L.; Reese, J.A.; Terrell, D.R.; Vesely, S.K.; George, J.N. url  openurl
  Title Drug-induced thrombotic microangiopathy: a systematic review of published reports Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Blood  
  Volume 125 Issue 4 Pages (down) 616-618  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Many patients with syndromes of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic-uremic syndrome, have been reported to have a drug-induced etiology, and many different drugs have been suspected as a cause of TMA. We established criteria to assess the strength of evidence for a causal association of a drug with TMA and systematically searched for all published reports of drug-induced TMA. We identified 1569 articles: 604 were retrieved for review, 344 reported evaluable data for 586 individual patients, 43 reported evaluable data on 46 patient groups. Seventy-eight drugs were described; 22 had evidence supporting a definite causal association with TMA. Three drugs accounted for 61 of the 104 patient reports with definite evidence (quinine, 34; cyclosporine, 15; tacrolimus, 12). Twenty additional drugs had evidence supporting a probable association with TMA. These criteria and data can provide support for clinicians evaluating patients with suspected TMA.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-4971 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45847  
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Author Mennin, D.S.; Fresco, D.M.; Ritter, M.; Heimberg, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An Open Trial Of Emotion Regulation Therapy For Generalized Anxiety Disorder And Cooccurring Depression Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Depression and Anxiety Abbreviated Journal Depress Anxiety  
  Volume 32 Issue 8 Pages (down) 614-623  
  Keywords Adult; Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology/*therapy; Cognitive Therapy/*methods; Comorbidity; Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology/*therapy; Emotions/*physiology; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute; Treatment Outcome; anxiety/anxiety disorders; behavior therapy; clinical trials; depression; emotion regulation; generalized anxiety disorder; mindfulness/meditation; treatment  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Although CBT is efficacious for a wide variety of psychiatric conditions, relatively fewer GAD patients achieve high endstate functioning as compared to patients receiving CBTs for other disorders. Moreover, GAD trials that utilized patient samples without prominent depression have tended to report that effect sizes for depressive outcomes were small or diminished to pretreatment levels in the follow-up period. Emotion regulation therapy (ERT) integrates principles from traditional and contemporary cognitive behavioral treatments with basic and translational findings from affect science to offer a blueprint for improving intervention by focusing on motivational, regulatory, and contextual learning mechanisms. METHOD: The purpose of this investigation was to provide initial support for the efficacy of ERT in an open trial of patients with GAD and cooccurring depressive symptoms. Twenty-one patients received a 20-session version of ERT delivered in weekly individual sessions. Standardized clinician ratings and self-report measures were assessed at pre-, mid-, and posttreatment as well as at three- and nine-month follow-ups. Intent-to-treat analyzes were utilized. RESULTS: GAD patients, half with comorbid major depression, evidenced statistically, and clinically meaningful improvements in symptom severity, impairment, quality of life, and in model-related outcomes including emotional/motivational intensity, mindful attending/acceptance, decentering, and cognitive reappraisal. Patients maintained gains across the three and nine month follow-up periods. CONCLUSIONS: These findings, although preliminary, provide additional evidence for the role of emotion dysregulation in the onset, maintenance, and now treatment of conditions such as GAD and cooccurring depressive symptoms.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1091-4269 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25945946 Approved no  
  Call Number UC @ arin.basu @ Serial 42595  
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Author Aiff, H.; Attman, P.O.; Aurell, M.; Bendz, H.; Ramsauer, B.; Schön, S.; Svedlund, J. url  openurl
  Title Effects of 10 to 30 years of lithium treatment on kidney function Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Psychopharmacol  
  Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages (down) 608-614  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Long-term lithium treatment is associated with end-stage renal disease, but there is little evidence of a clinically significant reduction in renal function in most patients. We previously found that 1.5% of people who took lithium from the 1960s and 1970s developed end-stage renal disease; however, none of the patients who started after 1980 had end-stage renal disease. Here we aimed to study the prevalence and extent of kidney damage during the course of long-term lithium treatment since 1980. We retrieved serum lithium and creatinine levels from 4879 patients examined between 1 January 1981 and 31 December 2010. Only patients who started their lithium treatment during the study period and had at least 10 years of cumulative treatment were included. The study group comprised 630 adult patients (402 women and 228 men) with normal creatinine levels at the start of lithium treatment. There was a yearly increase in median serum creatinine levels already from the first year of treatment. About one-third of the patients who had taken lithium for 10-29 years had evidence of chronic renal failure but only 5% were in the severe or very severe category. The results indicate that a substantial proportion of adult patients who are treated with lithium for more than a decade develop signs of renal functional impairment, also when treated according to modern therapeutic principles. Our results emphasise that lithium treatment requires continuous monitoring of kidney function.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-8811 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45943  
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Author Cook, W.J.; Senkovich, O.; Hernandez, A.; Speed, H.; Chattopadhyay, D. doi  openurl
  Title Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Biological Macromolecules  
  Volume 74 Issue Pages (down) 608-619  
  Keywords Amino Acid Sequence Binding Sites Cryptosporidium parvum Cryptosporidium parvum: enzymology Enzyme Activation Kinetics L-Lactate Dehydrogenase L-Lactate Dehydrogenase: chemistry L-Lactate Dehydrogenase: metabolism Models Molecular Molecular Sequence Data NAD NAD: chemistry NAD: metabolism NADP NADP: chemistry NADP: metabolism Protein Binding Protein Conformation Sequence Alignment Substrate Specificity  
  Abstract The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0141-8130 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes NULL Times cited: 12 Approved no  
  Call Number AG @ matthewjvarga @ Serial 46374  
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Author Dinesh, K.P.; Vijayakumar, S.P.; Channakeshavamurthy, B.H.; Torsekar, V.A.R.U.N.R.; Kulkarni, N.I.R.M.A.L.U.; Shanker, K.A.R.T.I.K. openurl 
  Title Erratum: KP DINESH, SP VIJAYAKUMAR, BH CHANNAKESHAVAMURTHY, VARUN R. TORSEKAR, NIRMAL U. KULKARNI & KARTIK SHANKER (2015) SYSTEMATIC STATUS OF FEJERVARYA (AMPHIBIA, ANURA, DICROGLOSSIDAE) FROM SOUTH AND SE ASIA WITH THE DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SPECIES FROM THE WESTERN GHATS OF PENINSULAR INDIA. Zootaxa, 3999 (1): 079-094 Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Zootaxa  
  Volume 4033 Issue 4 Pages (down) 600  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1175-5334 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 42980  
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Author Sekar, S.; Karanth, K.P. doi  openurl
  Title Does size matter? Comparative population genetics of two butterflies with different wingspans Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Organisms Diversity & Evolution  
  Volume 15 Issue 3 Pages (down) 567-575  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The dispersal ability of a species is central to its biology, affecting other processes like local adaptation, population and community dynamics, and genetic structure. Among the intrinsic, species-specific factors that affect dispersal ability in butterflies, wingspan was recently shown to explain a high amount of variance in dispersal ability. In this study, a comparative approach was adopted to test whether a difference in wingspan translates into a difference in population genetic structure. Two closely related butterfly species from subfamily Satyrinae, family Nymphalidae, which are similar with respect to all traits that affect dispersal ability except for wingspan, were studied. Melanitis leda (wingspan 60–80 mm) and Ypthima baldus (wingspan 30–40 mm) were collected from the same areas along the Western Ghats of southern India. Amplified fragment length polymorphisms were used to test whether the species with a higher wingspan (M. leda) exhibited a more homogenous population genetic structure, as compared to a species with a shorter wingspan (Y. baldus). In all analyses, Y. baldus exhibited greater degree of population genetic structuring. This study is one of the few adopting a comparative approach to establish the relationship between traits that affect dispersal ability and population genetic structure.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1618-1077 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43064  
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Author Pinho, S.S.; Reis, C.A. url  openurl
  Title Glycosylation in cancer: mechanisms and clinical implications Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Cancer  
  Volume 15 Issue 9 Pages (down) 540-555  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Despite recent progress in understanding the cancer genome, there is still a relative delay in understanding the full aspects of the glycome and glycoproteome of cancer. Glycobiology has been instrumental in relevant discoveries in various biological and medical fields, and has contributed to the deciphering of several human diseases. Glycans are involved in fundamental molecular and cell biology processes occurring in cancer, such as cell signalling and communication, tumour cell dissociation and invasion, cell-matrix interactions, tumour angiogenesis, immune modulation and metastasis formation. The roles of glycans in cancer have been highlighted by the fact that alterations in glycosylation regulate the development and progression of cancer, serving as important biomarkers and providing a set of specific targets for therapeutic intervention. This Review discusses the role of glycans in fundamental mechanisms controlling cancer development and progression, and their applications in oncology.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45283  
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