toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Jazaieri, H.; Morrison, A.S.; Goldin, P.R.; Gross, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of emotion and emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Current Psychiatry Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Psychiatry Rep  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages (down) 531  
  Keywords Anxiety Disorders/*psychology/*therapy; Cognitive Therapy/methods; *Emotions; Humans; Internal-External Control; Mindfulness/methods; *Social Behavior  
  Abstract Many psychiatric disorders involve problematic patterns of emotional reactivity and regulation. In this review, we consider recent findings regarding emotion and emotion regulation in the context of social anxiety disorder (SAD). We first describe key features of SAD which suggest altered emotional and self-related processing difficulties. Next, we lay the conceptual foundation for a discussion of emotion and emotion regulation and present a common framework for understanding emotion regulation, the process model of emotion regulation. Using the process model, we evaluate the recent empirical literature spanning self-report, observational, behavioral, and physiological methods across five specific families of emotion regulation processes-situation selection, situation modification, attentional deployment, cognitive change, and response modulation. Next, we examine the empirical evidence behind two psychosocial interventions for SAD: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR). Throughout, we present suggestions for future directions in the continued examination of emotion and emotion regulation in SAD.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Institute of Personality and Social Research, University of California, Berkeley, 4152 Tolman Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720-1650, USA, hooria@berkeley.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1523-3812 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25413637 Approved no  
  Call Number UC @ arin.basu @ Serial 42596  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Anderson-Teixeira, K.J.; Davies, S.J.; Bennett, A.C.; Gonzalez-Akre, E.B.; Muller-Landau, H.C.; Joseph Wright, S.; Abu Salim, K.; Almeyda Zambrano, A.M.; Alonso, A.; Baltzer, J.L.; Basset, Y.; Bourg, N.A.; Broadbent, E.N.; Brockelman, W.Y.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Burslem, D.F.R.P.; Butt, N.; Cao, M.; Cardenas, D.; Chuyong, G.B.; Clay, K.; Cordell, S.; Dattaraja, H.S.; Deng, X.; Detto, M.; Du, X.; Duque, A.; Erikson, D.L.; Ewango, C.E.N.; Fischer, G.A.; Fletcher, C.; Foster, R.B.; Giardina, C.P.; Gilbert, G.S.; Gunatilleke, N.; Gunatilleke, S.; Hao, Z.; Hargrove, W.W.; Hart, T.B.; Hau, B.C.H.; He, F.; Hoffman, F.M.; Howe, R.W.; Hubbell, S.P.; Inman-Narahari, F.M.; Jansen, P.A.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, D.J.; Kanzaki, M.; Kassim, A.R.; Kenfack, D.; Kibet, S.; Kinnaird, M.F.; Korte, L.; Kral, K.; Kumar, J.; Larson, A.J.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Liu, S.; Lum, S.K.Y.; Lutz, J.A.; Ma, K.; Maddalena, D.M.; Makana, J.-R.; Malhi, Y.; Marthews, T.; Mat Serudin, R.; McMahon, S.M.; McShea, W.J.; Memiaghe, H.R.; Mi, X.; Mizuno, T.; Morecroft, M.; Myers, J.A.; Novotny, V.; de Oliveira, A.A.; Ong, P.S.; Orwig, D.A.; Ostertag, R.; den Ouden, J.; Parker, G.G.; Phillips, R.P.; Sack, L.; Sainge, M.N.; Sang, W.; Sri-ngernyuang, K.; Sukumar, R.; Sun, I.-F.; Sungpalee, W.; Suresh, H.S.; Tan, S.; Thomas, S.C.; Thomas, D.W.; Thompson, J.; Turner, B.L.; Uriarte, M.; Valencia, R.; Vallejo, M.I.; Vicentini, A.; Vrška, T.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.; Weiblen, G.; Wolf, A.; Xu, H.; Yap, S.; Zimmerman, J. doi  openurl
  Title CTFS-ForestGEO: a worldwide network monitoring forests in an era of global change Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Global Change Biology  
  Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages (down) 528-549  
  Keywords biodiversity; Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS); climate change; demography; forest dynamics plot; Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO); long-term monitoring; spatial analysis  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1365-2486 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43015  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tzannidakis, N.C.A.; Frewen, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Trauma-Related Altered States of Consciousness (TRASC) and Functional Impairment II: Perceived Causal Relationships in an Online Sample Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Trauma & Dissociation : the Official Journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation (ISSD) Abbreviated Journal J Trauma Dissociation  
  Volume 16 Issue 5 Pages (down) 520-540  
  Keywords 4-D model; childhood abuse and neglect; dissociation; posttraumatic stress disorder; trauma-related altered states of consciousness  
  Abstract Research supports the existence of a dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder, although studies have not directly compared the perceived impact of dissociative versus nondissociative posttraumatic symptoms on social and occupational functioning. In addition, research is beginning to differentiate between posttraumatic distress associated with normal waking consciousness (NWC) and dissociative experiences of trauma-related altered states of consciousness (TRASC) along multiple phenomenological dimensions. The current study investigated perceived causal relationships between posttraumatic symptoms associated with NWC-distress and TRASC on the one hand and interpersonal and occupational functioning on the other. Although both TRASC and NWC-distress independently accounted for variance in self-reported interpersonal and occupational problems, perceived causal relationship results showed that individuals tended to attribute their social and work-related problems more strongly to NWC-distress than to TRASC. Future research directions are discussed.  
  Address b Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry and Graduate Program in Neuroscience , Western University , London , Ontario , Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1529-9732 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26308190 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42175  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adebayo, D.; Morabito, V.; Davenport, A.; Jalan, R. url  openurl
  Title Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis is not just a vasomotor nephropathy Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Kidney Int  
  Volume 87 Issue 3 Pages (down) 509-515  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The short-term mortality of cirrhotic patients who develop renal dysfunction remains unacceptably high, and as such the treatment of this condition is an unmet need. Although features of kidney injury are well recognized in these patients, the pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in renal dysfunction occurring on a background of cirrhosis is key to developing effective treatment strategies to improve survival. Renal dysfunction due to hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is characteristic of cirrhosis. Our current understanding is that HRS is functional in nature and occurs as a consequence of hemodynamic changes associated with portal hypertension. However, there is evidence in the literature suggesting that, histologically, the kidneys are not always normal in the vast majority of patients who present with renal dysfunction on the background of cirrhosis. Furthermore, there is emerging data implicating nonvasomotor mechanisms in the pathophysiology of renal dysfunction in cirrhosis. This mini-review aims to present the evidence suggesting that factors other than hemodynamic dysregulation have an important role in the development of this major complication for patients with progressive cirrhosis.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0085-2538 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45609  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chiolerio, A.; Camarchia, V.; Quaglia, R.; Pirola, M.; Pandolfi, P.; Pirri, C.F. url  openurl
  Title Hybrid Ag-based inks for nanocomposite inkjet printed lines: RF properties Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Journal of Alloys and Compounds  
  Volume 615 Issue S1 Pages (down) S501-S504  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Cited By :6; Export Date: 2 November 2016 Approved no  
  Call Number IIT-CSF @ alessandro.chiolerio @ Serial 42779  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Frewen, P.; Hegadoren, K.; Coupland, N.J.; Rowe, B.H.; Neufeld, R.W.J.; Lanius, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Trauma-Related Altered States of Consciousness (TRASC) and Functional Impairment I: Prospective Study in Acutely Traumatized Persons Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Trauma & Dissociation : the Official Journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation (ISSD) Abbreviated Journal J Trauma Dissociation  
  Volume 16 Issue 5 Pages (down) 500-519  
  Keywords 4-D model; childhood abuse and neglect; dissociation; posttraumatic stress disorder; trauma-related altered states of consciousness  
  Abstract A theoretical framework referred to as a 4-D model has been described for classifying posttraumatic stress symptoms into those potentially occurring within normal waking consciousness (NWC) versus those thought to intrinsically exemplify dissociative experiences, specifically, trauma-related altered states of consciousness (TRASC). As a further test of this theoretical distinction, this prospective study evaluated whether TRASC and NWC forms of distress incrementally and prospectively predicted functional impairment at 6 and 12 weeks following presentation at hospital emergency departments in the acute aftermath of traumatic events in 180 persons. Establishing the clinical significance of both TRASC and NWC-distress symptoms, we found that 6-week markers of TRASC and NWC-distress independently predicted 12-week self-reported levels of social and occupational impairment. We also observed broad support for various predictions of the 4-D model except that, in contrast with hypotheses, childhood trauma history was generally more strongly correlated with symptoms of NWC-distress than with TRASC. Future research directions are discussed.  
  Address f Department of Psychiatry and Graduate Program in Neuroscience , Western University , London , Ontario , Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1529-9732 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26378486 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42174  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Patch, A.M.; Christie, E.L.; Etemadmoghadam, D.; Garsed, D.W.; George, J.; Fereday, S.; Nones, K.; Cowin, P.; Alsop, K.; Bailey, P.J.; Kassahn, K.S.; Newell, F.; Quinn, M.C.; Kazakoff, S.; Quek, K.; Wilhelm-Benartzi, C.; Curry, E.; Leong, H.S.; Australian, O.C.S.G.; Hamilton, A.; Mileshkin, L.; Au-Yeung, G.; Kennedy, C.; Hung, J.; Chiew, Y.E.; Harnett, P.; Friedlander, M.; Quinn, M.; Pyman, J.; Cordner, S.; O’Brien, P.; Leditschke, J.; Young, G.; Strachan, K.; Waring, P.; Azar, W.; Mitchell, C.; Traficante, N.; Hendley, J.; Thorne, H.; Shackleton, M.; Miller, D.K.; Arnau, G.M.; Tothill, R.W.; Holloway, T.P.; Semple, T.; Harliwong, I.; Nourse, C.; Nourbakhsh, E.; Manning, S.; Idrisoglu, S.; Bruxner, T.J.; Christ, A.N.; Poudel, B.; Holmes, O.; Anderson, M.; Leonard, C.; Lonie, A.; Hall, N.; Wood, S.; Taylor, D.F.; Xu, Q.; Fink, J.L.; Waddell, N.; Drapkin, R.; Stronach, E.; Gabra, H.; Brown, R.; Jewell, A.; Nagaraj, S.H.; Markham, E.; Wilson, P.J.; Ellul, J.; McNally, O.; Doyle, M.A.; Vedururu, R.; Stewart, C.; Lengyel, E.; Pearson, J.V.; Waddell, N.; deFazio, A.; Grimmond, S.M.; Bowtell, D.D. url  openurl
  Title Whole-genome characterization of chemoresistant ovarian cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 521 Issue 7553 Pages (down) 489-494  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) have experienced little improvement in overall survival, and standard treatment has not advanced beyond platinum-based combination chemotherapy, during the past 30 years. To understand the drivers of clinical phenotypes better, here we use whole-genome sequencing of tumour and germline DNA samples from 92 patients with primary refractory, resistant, sensitive and matched acquired resistant disease. We show that gene breakage commonly inactivates the tumour suppressors RB1, NF1, RAD51B and PTEN in HGSC, and contributes to acquired chemotherapy resistance. CCNE1 amplification was common in primary resistant and refractory disease. We observed several molecular events associated with acquired resistance, including multiple independent reversions of germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in individual patients, loss of BRCA1 promoter methylation, an alteration in molecular subtype, and recurrent promoter fusion associated with overexpression of the drug efflux pump MDR1.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45069  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Watkins, A.M.; Arora, P.S. url  openurl
  Title Structure-based inhibition of protein-protein interactions Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Eur J Med Chem  
  Volume 94 Issue Pages (down) 480-488  
  Keywords grant, drug design  
  Abstract Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are emerging as attractive targets for drug design because of their central role in directing normal and aberrant cellular functions. These interactions were once considered “undruggable” because their large and dynamic interfaces make small molecule inhibitor design challenging. However, landmark advances in computational analysis, fragment screening and molecular design have enabled development of a host of promising strategies to address the fundamental molecular recognition challenge. An attractive approach for targeting PPIs involves mimicry of protein domains that are critical for complex formation. This approach recognizes that protein subdomains or protein secondary structures are often present at interfaces and serve as organized scaffolds for the presentation of side chain groups that engage the partner protein(s). Design of protein domain mimetics is in principle rather straightforward but is enabled by a host of computational strategies that provide predictions of important residues that should be mimicked. Herein we describe a workflow proceeding from interaction network analysis, to modeling a complex structure, to identifying a high-affinity sub-structure, to developing interaction inhibitors. We apply the design procedure to peptidomimetic inhibitors of Ras-mediated signaling.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1768-3254 0223-5234 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number AG @ matthewjvarga @ Serial 46798  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Armour, C.; Hansen, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing DSM-5 latent subtypes of acute stress disorder dissociative or intrusive? Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Psychiatry Research Abbreviated Journal Psychiatry Res  
  Volume 225 Issue 3 Pages (down) 476-483  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; *Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; Dissociative Disorders/classification/*diagnosis/psychology; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Risk Factors; Social Support; Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/classification/*diagnosis/psychology; ASD subtypes; Dissociative ASD; Intrusive ASD; Latent profile analysis; Risk factors  
  Abstract Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) was first included in the DSM-IV in 1994. It was proposed to account for traumatic responding in the early post trauma phase and to act as an identifier for later Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Unlike PTSD it included a number of dissociative indicators. The revised DSM-5 PTSD criterion included a dissociative-PTSD subtype. The current study assessed if a dissociative-ASD subtype may be present for DSM-5 ASD. Moreover, we assessed if a number of risk factors resulted in an increased probability of membership in symptomatic compared to a baseline ASD profile. We used data from 450 bank robbery victims. Latent profile analysis (LPA) was used to uncover latent profiles of ASD. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine if female gender, age, social support, peritraumatic panic, somatization, and number of trauma exposures increased or decreased the probability of profile membership. Four latent profiles were uncovered and included an intrusion rather than dissociative subtype. Increased age and social support decreased the probability of individuals being grouped into the intrusion subtype whereas increased peritraumatic panic and somatization increased the probability of individuals being grouped into the intrusion subtype. Findings are discussed in regard to the ICD-11 and the DSM-5.  
  Address National Centre for Psychotraumatology, Institute for Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-1781 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25535010 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42196  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ariceta, G.; Lara, E.; Camacho, J.A.; Oppenheimer, F.; Vara, J.; Santos, F.; Muñoz, M.A.; Cantarell, C.; Gil Calvo, M.; Romero, R.; Valenciano, B.; García-Nieto, V.; Sanahuja, M.J.; Crespo, J.; Justa, M.L.; Urisarri, A.; Bedoya, R.; Bueno, A.; Daza, A.; Bravo, J.; Llamas, F.; Jiménez Del Cerro, L.A. url  openurl
  Title Cysteamine (Cystagon®) adherence in patients with cystinosis in Spain: successful in children and a challenge in adolescents and adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Nephrol Dial Transplant  
  Volume 30 Issue 3 Pages (down) 475-480  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cysteamine has improved survival and prognosis in cystinosis. Increasing numbers of patients reach adulthood and face new challenges such as compliance that wanes over time. The aim of this study was to evaluate adherence to cysteamine treatment in a group of cystinotic patients in Spain in an attempt to identify potential therapy pitfalls and improve the overall care of affected individuals. Despite the impact of cysteamine on prognosis, there is a paucity of data regarding adherence. METHOD: Thirty-four cystinotic patients (21 male) 38% ≥18 years were enrolled in a voluntary, anonymous survey. Replies were obtained from patients (15/34), mothers (11/34), fathers (4/34) and both parents (4/34). RESULTS: Patient age (median and interquartile range) at diagnosis was 1 year (0.57-1), and patient age at Cystagon® initiation was also 1 year (0.8-1.8). Sixteen (47%) were kidney transplant (KTx) recipients; six were retransplanted. Age at first KTx 10 years (8.7-13.7). Patient understanding of multiorgan involvement in cystinosis: 4.1 organs reported; eye 97% and kidney 91%. Cysteamine was given by mother (100%) and father (83%) in <11 year olds, or self-administered (94%) in ≥11 year olds. Four daily doses in 89% versus 56% in <11 year olds or ≥11 year olds, with fixed schedule in 94% versus 50% in <11 or ≥11 year olds and progressive loss of reminders over time. Furthermore, 44% complained of unpleasant smell. Motivation for treatment compliance was 100% versus 40% in <11 versus ≥11 year olds, respectively. Disease impact in patients <18 years is as follows: school (29%), social (14%), ‘feeling different’ (10%); in patients ≥18 years: ‘feeling different’ (62%), professional (39%) and job absenteeism (31%). Referring physician: paediatric nephrologist (94%) and nephrologist (63%) in <11 versus ≥11 year olds. Ophthalmological follow-up: 83% versus 38% in <11 versus ≥11 year olds. Patient opinion of physician expertise: paediatric nephrologist (94%) and nephrologist (44%). New treatment options (65%) and better information (42%) were demanded to improve adherence. CONCLUSION: Treatment with Cystagon is effective in young patients. However, adherence diminishes over time in adolescents and adults despite disease impact. Strategies such as better information on the disease, patient self-care promotion and facilitated transition to adult healthcare services are required to improve compliance and the clinical management of cystinosis.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0931-0509 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45856  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: