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Author Auxemery, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title [Clinical forms of post-traumatic depression] Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication L'Encephale Abbreviated Journal Encephale  
  Volume 41 Issue 4 Pages 346-354  
  Keywords Deuil post-traumatique; Deuil traumatique; Depression masquee; Depression post-traumatique; Depression traumatique; Post-concussive syndrome; Posttraumatic depression; Posttraumatic grief; Psychic trauma; Psychopathologie; Psychopathology; Psychopharmacologie; Psychopharmacology; Syndrome post-commotionnel; Traumatic depression; Traumatic grief; Traumatisme psychique  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: As a result of determinants specific to the psychopathological structure of the psychological trauma, psycho-traumatised patients very rarely solicit the health care system directly with a request for treatment centred on their trauma. The medical profession is consulted for non-specific symptoms and complications, which are mainly somatoform, addictions and depressive disorders. After a few epidemiological reminders followed by a discussion concerning contemporary depressive and post-traumatic nosographic features, we define, through our clinical experience collated with the data in the literature, different clinical and etiopathogenic contexts of post-traumatic depression in order to control their therapeutic treatment. CLINICAL FINDINGS: Burnout post-traumatic depression in response to re-experiencing is the most common: it is a reactive psycho-physiological burnout in response to the emotional distress re-experienced during flashbacks, insomnia, a constant feeling of insecurity and the deleterious consequences of this symptomatology in terms of social adaptation. A common genetic predisposition affecting serotoninergic regulation seems to be a vulnerability marker of both depressive and psychotraumatic symptoms. In this case, SSRI will be effective on sadness. In addition, these antidepressants have been widely prescribed for the first-line treatment of depressive and psychotraumatic symptoms. However, this pharmacological class is often insufficient in relieving autonomic hyperactivity such as re-experiencing which are mediated more by noradrenergic hyperactivity. SNRI such as venlafaxine can be used as a first-line treatment. Post-traumatic depression with psychotic features congruent with mood is dominated by a feeling of incurability; the subject blames himself and feels guilty about the traumatic event and its consequences. Symptoms of denial of identity are sometimes observed: confined by an intense depersonalization, the psycho-traumatised subject evokes that he is “no longer himself” and that his mind “is disconnected”. Confronted with the psychological emptiness of the traumatic scene, the psycho-traumatised subject remains devoid of thought as if their mind has left him. In addition to antidepressant therapy, an atypical antipsychotic drug must be prescribed to relieve the melancholic symptoms as well as the concomitant psychotraumatic symptoms. Post-traumatic depression masked by peripheral physical injuries is the result of accidents combining psychological and physical impairment. The physical pain resulting from the accident regularly recalls the drama in the same way as traumatic re-experiencing. Depression masked by this somatic suffering is difficult to diagnose, but the repeated somatic complaints at the forefront of the request for treatment, the breakdown of self-esteem as well as the level of subjective strain due to pain and dysesthesia are all indications. The psychotherapy will focus on the symbolic reconstruction of the organs that have been damaged or destroyed, with the aim of healing the extensive narcissistic impairment. Post-concussive depression is diagnosed following a head trauma, however severe. It is sometimes assigned to neurological lesions and at other times recognised as the expression of a purely psychological reaction. Antidepressant therapy, or possibly trial therapy, is often indicated. The terms traumatic grief and post-traumatic grief are often used synonymously in publications: a conceptual opposition must however been recalled. If the traumatic grief is the result of the loss of an object that holds much psychological importance for the individual, the subject has not however been traumatised by this event and is not suffering and will not suffer from re-experiencing. The therapy will include methods used in the psychotherapeutic treatment of grief; antidepressants are often insufficient. Differently, post-traumatic grief takes shape when the loss of another is concomitant with the confrontation with the reality of the death witnessed in a moment of peri-traumatic dissociation. This grief is often observed following the discovery of the body of a close friend or family member who has committed suicide, or when part of a family has been decimated by an accident whilst the survivors watch their close relations die pending the arrival of the emergency services, or when a military comrade is wounded in combat in front of his partner. The mourning process cannot really begin until the flashbacks cease. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical depression or even melancholia, possibly masked by somatic or post-concussive complaints, is often the initial mode of contact with the health care system for the psycho-traumatised subject. The different clinical and etiopathogenic contexts of post-traumatic depression that we have developed in this work use specific therapies which need to be clarified by further research based on this nosography.  
  Address Service medical de psychologie clinique appliquee a l'aeronautique, hopital d'instruction des Armees Percy, 101, avenue Henri-Barbusse, BP406, 92141 Clamart, France. Electronic address: yann.auxemery@hotmail.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language French Summary Language Original Title Formes cliniques des depressions post-traumatiques  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0013-7006 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25238908 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42198  
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Author Nash, W.P.; Boasso, A.M.; Steenkamp, M.M.; Larson, J.L.; Lubin, R.E.; Litz, B.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Posttraumatic stress in deployed Marines: prospective trajectories of early adaptation Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Abnormal Psychology Abbreviated Journal J Abnorm Psychol  
  Volume 124 Issue 1 Pages 155-171  
  Keywords  
  Abstract We examined the course of PTSD symptoms in a cohort of U.S. Marines (N = 867) recruited for the Marine Resiliency Study (MRS) from a single infantry battalion that deployed as a unit for 7 months to Afghanistan during the peak of conflict there. Data were collected via structured interviews and self-report questionnaires 1 month prior to deployment and again at 1, 5, and 8 months postdeployment. Second-order growth mixture modeling was used to disaggregate symptom trajectories; multinomial logistic regression and relative weights analysis were used to assess the role of combat exposure, prior life span trauma, social support, peritraumatic dissociation, and avoidant coping as predictors of trajectory membership. Three trajectories best fit the data: a low-stable symptom course (79%), a new-onset PTSD symptoms course (13%), and a preexisting PTSD symptoms course (8%). Comparison in a separate MRS cohort with lower levels of combat exposure yielded similar results, except for the absence of a new-onset trajectory. In the main cohort, the modal trajectory was a low-stable symptoms course that included a small but clinically meaningful increase in symptoms from predeployment to 1 month postdeployment. We found no trajectory of recovery from more severe symptoms in either cohort, suggesting that the relative change in symptoms from predeployment to 1 month postdeployment might provide the best indicator of first-year course. The best predictors of trajectory membership were peritraumatic dissociation and avoidant coping, suggesting that changes in cognition, perception, and behavior following trauma might be particularly useful indicators of first-year outcomes.  
  Address VA Boston Healthcare System  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0021-843X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25419860 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42197  
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Author Gulbahar, O.; Konca Degertekin, C.; Akturk, M.; Yalcin, M.M.; Kalan, I.; Atikeler, G.F.; Altinova, A.E.; Yetkin, I.; Arslan, M.; Toruner, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Case With Immunoassay Interferences in the Measurement of Multiple Hormones Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 100 Issue 6 Pages 2147-2153  
  Keywords Adult; Antibodies, Heterophile/*blood; *Artifacts; Cross Reactions; *Diagnostic Techniques, Endocrine/standards; False Positive Reactions; Female; Hormones/*analysis; Humans; Immunoassay/methods; Postpartum Period/blood/immunology  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Commonly used immunoassays are not free from interference, which can be a confounder in the interpretation of test results. We present a case with extremely high multiple hormone levels due to such interference. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 33-year-old woman with no specific symptoms had markedly elevated TSH with normal free T4 and free T3 levels. Repeated measurements revealed discordantly high TSH, ACTH, FSH, PTH, IGF-1, prolactin, beta-human chorionic gonadotropin, and calcitonin levels without the associated clinical pictures. The measurements were repeated with the same patient sample on four different analytical platforms using chemiluminescence immunoassays/electrochemiluminescence immunoassays, and the results were divergent on each platform. Serial dilutions of serum samples revealed nonlinearity, suggesting assay interference. All hormonal measurements were in the normal range when heterophile antibody blocking tubes were used. The serum of the patient was then subjected to polyethylene glycol precipitation. The post-polyethylene glycol recovery resulted in hormone levels in the normal range. The patient did not receive any medications and has been under follow-up without any signs and symptoms for 24 months. CONCLUSIONS: This report illustrates a rare case of falsely elevated hormone levels due to assay interference caused by heterophile antibodies. We point out the importance of a close collaboration between clinicians and the laboratory to avoid unnecessary clinical investigations as well as inappropriate treatments.  
  Address Departments of Biochemistry (O.G., G.F.A.) and Endocrinology and Metabolism (C.K.D., M.A., M.M.Y., I.K., A.E.A., I.Y., M.A., F.T.), Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, 06100 Ankara, Turkey  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25897621 Approved no  
  Call Number QEHB @ isla.wootton @ Serial 42160  
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Author Al-Awqati, Q. url  openurl
  Title Kidney growth and hypertrophy: the role of mTOR and vesicle trafficking Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Clin Invest  
  Volume 125 Issue 6 Pages 2267-2270  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The kidney, like other organs, grows in constant proportion to the rest of the body. When one kidney is removed, the remaining one hypertrophies. In a comprehensive series of studies, Chen et al. show that growth during maturation is mediated by the mTORC1 signaling pathway, which is induced by EGF-like peptides, and requires PI3K, PDK, AKT, mTORC2, and activation of mTORC1 through the combined effects of TSC and RHEB as part of a multiprotein complex localized on lysosomes. However, compensatory growth is mediated by amino acids, which act on mTORC1 independently of the previous pathway, and requires a class III PI3K (VPS34) that is known to be involved in vesicle trafficking to the lysosomes.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0021-9738 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45804  
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Author Albers, J.; Danzer, C.; Rechsteiner, M.; Lehmann, H.; Brandt, L.P.; Hejhal, T.; Catalano, A.; Busenhart, P.; Gonçalves, A.F.; Brandt, S.; Bode, P.K.; Bode-Lesniewska, B.; Wild, P.J.; Frew, I.J. url  openurl
  Title A versatile modular vector system for rapid combinatorial mammalian genetics Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Clin Invest  
  Volume 125 Issue 4 Pages 1603-1619  
  Keywords Animals; Apoptosis; Caspase 9; Cells, Cultured; Cloning, Molecular; Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats; Doxycycline; Drug Resistance; Gene Deletion; Gene Knockdown Techniques; Genetic Vectors; Humans; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit; Lentivirus; Mice; Mice, SCID; PTEN Phosphohydrolase; Recombination, Genetic; research support, non-u.s. gov’t; Retinoblastoma Protein; RNA, Small Interfering; Sarcoma, Experimental; Transduction, Genetic; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays; Cas9/CRIPSR; Journal club  
  Abstract Here, we describe the multiple lentiviral expression (MuLE) system that allows multiple genetic alterations to be introduced simultaneously into mammalian cells. We created a toolbox of MuLE vectors that constitute a flexible, modular system for the rapid engineering of complex polycistronic lentiviruses, allowing combinatorial gene overexpression, gene knockdown, Cre-mediated gene deletion, or CRISPR/Cas9-mediated (where CRISPR indicates clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) gene mutation, together with expression of fluorescent or enzymatic reporters for cellular assays and animal imaging. Examples of tumor engineering were used to illustrate the speed and versatility of performing combinatorial genetics using the MuLE system. By transducing cultured primary mouse cells with single MuLE lentiviruses, we engineered tumors containing up to 5 different genetic alterations, identified genetic dependencies of molecularly defined tumors, conducted genetic interaction screens, and induced the simultaneous CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of 3 tumor-suppressor genes. Intramuscular injection of MuLE viruses expressing oncogenic H-RasG12V together with combinations of knockdowns of the tumor suppressors cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (Cdkn2a), transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53), and phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) allowed the generation of 3 murine sarcoma models, demonstrating that genetically defined autochthonous tumors can be rapidly generated and quantitatively monitored via direct injection of polycistronic MuLE lentiviruses into mouse tissues. Together, our results demonstrate that the MuLE system provides genetic power for the systematic investigation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie human diseases.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN (up) 0021-9738 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45848  
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Author Briere, J.; Runtz, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dissociation in individuals denying trauma exposure: findings from two samples Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease Abbreviated Journal J Nerv Ment Dis  
  Volume 203 Issue 6 Pages 439-442  
  Keywords Adult; Affective Symptoms/*psychology; Aged; Dissociative Disorders/*psychology; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Young Adult  
  Abstract A number of studies suggest that dissociation is reliably related to trauma exposure, and that inadequate regulation of posttraumatic distress may be a significant factor. We examined whether affect dysregulation predicts dissociation in those denying any lifetime exposure to trauma. These relationships were evaluated in a general population sample and a second sample of nontraumatized university students. In the first study, multivariate analyses indicated that, along with gender, affect dysregulation was a relatively strong predictor, accounting for 27% of the variance in dissociation. In the replication study, dissociation was associated with affect dysregulation, but not gender. Affect dysregulation seems to predict dissociative symptomatology in nontraumatized individuals. It is hypothesized that emotional distress, whether from trauma or other etiologies, motivates dissociation to the extent that it challenges the individual's compromised capacity for affect regulation. Treatment implications may include the potential helpfulness of interventions that increase emotion regulation skills.  
  Address *Departments of Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences and Psychology, Keck School of Medicine University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; and daggerDepartment of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0022-3018 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25974057 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42185  
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Author Tsai, J.; Armour, C.; Southwick, S.M.; Pietrzak, R.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dissociative subtype of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder in U.S. veterans Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Psychiatric Research Abbreviated Journal J Psychiatr Res  
  Volume 66-67 Issue Pages 67-74  
  Keywords Dissociation; Posttraumatic stress disorder; Substance abuse; Veterans  
  Abstract The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5) formally introduced a dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study examined the proportion of U.S. veterans with DSM-5 PTSD that report dissociative symptoms; and compared veterans with PTSD with and without the dissociative subtype and trauma-exposed controls on sociodemographics, clinical characteristics, and quality of life. Multivariable analyses were conducted on a nationally representative sample of 1484 veterans from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study (second baseline survey conducted September-October, 2013). Of the 12.0% and 5.2% of veterans who screened positive for lifetime and past-month DSM-5 PTSD, 19.2% and 16.1% screened positive for the dissociative subtype, respectively. Among veterans with PTSD, those with the dissociative subtype reported more severe PTSD symptoms, comorbid depressive and anxiety symptoms, alcohol use problems, and hostility than those without the dissociative subtype. Adjusting for PTSD symptom severity, those with the dissociative subtype continued to report more depression and alcohol use problems. These results underscore the importance of assessing, monitoring, and treating the considerable proportion of veterans with PTSD and dissociative symptoms.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States; United States Department of Veterans Affairs, National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Clinical Neurosciences Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, United States  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0022-3956 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25969340 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42186  
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Author Aichler, M.; Walch, A. url  openurl
  Title MALDI Imaging mass spectrometry: current frontiers and perspectives in pathology research and practice Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Lab Invest  
  Volume 95 Issue 4 Pages 422-431  
  Keywords  
  Abstract MALDI Imaging mass spectrometry has entered the field of tissue-based research by providing unique advantages for analyzing tissue specimen in an unprecedented detail. A broad spectrum of analytes ranging from proteins, peptides, protein modification over small molecules, drugs and their metabolites as well as pharmaceutical components, endogenous cell metabolites, lipids, and other analytes are made accessible by this in situ technique in tissue. Some of them were even not accessible in tissues within the histological context before. Thereby, the great advantage of MALDI Imaging is the correlation of molecular information with traditional histology by keeping the spatial localization information of the analytes after mass spectrometric measurement. This method is label-free and allows multiplex analysis of hundreds to thousands of molecules in the very same tissue section simultaneously. Imaging mass spectrometry brings a new quality of molecular data and links the expert discipline of pathology and deep molecular mass spectrometric analysis to tissue-based research. This review will focus on state-of-the-art of MALDI Imaging mass spectrometry, its recent applications by analyzing tissue specimen and the contributions in understanding the biology of disease as well as its perspectives for pathology research and practice.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0023-6837 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45924  
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Author Adebayo, D.; Morabito, V.; Davenport, A.; Jalan, R. url  openurl
  Title Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis is not just a vasomotor nephropathy Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Kidney Int  
  Volume 87 Issue 3 Pages 509-515  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The short-term mortality of cirrhotic patients who develop renal dysfunction remains unacceptably high, and as such the treatment of this condition is an unmet need. Although features of kidney injury are well recognized in these patients, the pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in renal dysfunction occurring on a background of cirrhosis is key to developing effective treatment strategies to improve survival. Renal dysfunction due to hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is characteristic of cirrhosis. Our current understanding is that HRS is functional in nature and occurs as a consequence of hemodynamic changes associated with portal hypertension. However, there is evidence in the literature suggesting that, histologically, the kidneys are not always normal in the vast majority of patients who present with renal dysfunction on the background of cirrhosis. Furthermore, there is emerging data implicating nonvasomotor mechanisms in the pathophysiology of renal dysfunction in cirrhosis. This mini-review aims to present the evidence suggesting that factors other than hemodynamic dysregulation have an important role in the development of this major complication for patients with progressive cirrhosis.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0085-2538 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45609  
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Author Andeen, N.K.; Nguyen, T.Q.; Steegh, F.; Hudkins, K.L.; Najafian, B.; Alpers, C.E. url  openurl
  Title The phenotypes of podocytes and parietal epithelial cells may overlap in diabetic nephropathy Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Kidney Int  
  Volume 88 Issue 5 Pages 1099-1107  
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  Abstract Reversal of diabetic nephropathy (DN) has been achieved in humans and mice, but only rarely and under special circumstances. As progression of DN is related to podocyte loss, reversal of DN requires restoration of podocytes. Here, we identified and quantified potential glomerular progenitor cells that could be a source for restored podocytes. DN was identified in 31 human renal biopsy cases and separated into morphologically early or advanced lesions. Markers of podocytes (WT-1, p57), parietal epithelial cells (PECs) (claudin-1), and cell proliferation (Ki-67) were identified by immunohistochemistry. Podocyte density was progressively reduced with DN. Cells marking as podocytes (p57) were present infrequently on Bowman’s capsule in controls, but significantly increased in histologically early DN. Ki-67-expressing cells were identified on the glomerular tuft and Bowman’s capsule in DN, but rarely in controls. Cells marking as PECs were present on the glomerular tuft, particularly in morphologically advanced DN. These findings show evidence of phenotypic plasticity in podocyte and PEC populations and are consistent with studies in the BTBR ob/ob murine model in which reversibility of DN occurs with podocytes potentially regenerating from PEC precursors. Thus, our findings support, but do not prove, that podocytes may regenerate from PEC progenitors in human DN. If so, progression of DN may represent a modifiable net balance between podocyte loss and regeneration.  
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  ISSN (up) 0085-2538 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45953  
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