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Author Ranganathan, Y.; Bessière, J.-M.; Borges, R.M. url  openurl
  Title A coat of many scents: Cuticular hydrocarbons in multitrophic interactions of fig wasps with ants Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acta Oecologica  
  Volume 67 Issue (up) Pages 24-33  
  Keywords Alkanes; Alkenes; Chemical camouflage; Ficus racemosa; Polyenes; Prey recognition  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43074  
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Author Ramachandra, T.V.; Aithal, B.H.; Sreejith, K. url  openurl
  Title GHG footprint of major cities in India Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews  
  Volume 44 Issue (up) Pages 473-495  
  Keywords GHG footprint; Global warming potential; Greenhouse gases (GHG); Gross domestic product; India; Major cities; Transportation sector  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1364-0321 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43117  
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Author Mukherjee, N.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Koedam, N.; Shanker, K. url  openurl
  Title An interdisciplinary framework to evaluate bioshield plantations: Insights from peninsular India Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Acta Oecologica  
  Volume 63 Issue (up) Pages 91-100  
  Keywords Bioshield; Coastal plantations; Framework; India; Indian Ocean tsunami; Survey  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43125  
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Author Kampan, N.C.; Madondo, M.T.; McNally, O.M.; Quinn, M.; Plebanski, M. url  openurl
  Title Paclitaxel and Its Evolving Role in the Management of Ovarian Cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Biomed Res Int  
  Volume 2015 Issue (up) Pages 413076  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Paclitaxel, a class of taxane with microtubule stabilising ability, has remained with platinum based therapy, the standard care for primary ovarian cancer management. A deeper understanding of the immunological basis and other potential mechanisms of action together with new dosing schedules and/or routes of administration may potentiate its clinical benefit. Newer forms of taxanes, with better safety profiles and higher intratumoural cytotoxicity, have yet to demonstrate clinical superiority over the parent compound.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45056  
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Author Butterfield, L.H. url  openurl
  Title Cancer vaccines Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Bmj  
  Volume 350 Issue (up) Pages h988  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients’ immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45100  
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Author Lannoo, N.; Van Damme, E.J. url  openurl
  Title Review/N-glycans: The making of a varied toolbox Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Plant Sci  
  Volume 239 Issue (up) Pages 67-83  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Asparagine (N)-linked protein glycosylation is one of the most crucial, prevalent, and complex co- and post-translational protein modifications. It plays a pivotal role in protein folding, quality control, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) as well as in protein sorting, protein function, and in signal transduction. Furthermore, glycosylation modulates many important biological processes including growth, development, morphogenesis, and stress signaling processes. As a consequence, aberrant or altered N-glycosylation is often associated with reduced fitness, diseases, and disorders. The initial steps of N-glycan synthesis at the cytosolic side of the ER membrane and in the lumen of the ER are highly conserved. In contrast, the final N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus is organism-specific giving rise to a wide variety of carbohydrate structures. Despite our vast knowledge on N-glycans in yeast and mammals, the modus operandi of N-glycan signaling in plants is still largely unknown. This review will elaborate on the N-glycosylation biosynthesis pathway in plants but will also critically assess how N-glycans are involved in different signaling cascades, either active during normal development or upon abiotic and biotic stresses.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45205  
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Author Stowell, S.R.; Ju, T.; Cummings, R.D. url  openurl
  Title Protein glycosylation in cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Annu Rev Pathol  
  Volume 10 Issue (up) Pages 473-510  
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  Abstract Neoplastic transformation results in a wide variety of cellular alterations that impact the growth, survival, and general behavior of affected tissue. Although genetic alterations underpin the development of neoplastic disease, epigenetic changes can exert an equally significant effect on neoplastic transformation. Among neoplasia-associated epigenetic alterations, changes in cellular glycosylation have recently received attention as a key component of neoplastic progression. Alterations in glycosylation appear to not only directly impact cell growth and survival but also facilitate tumor-induced immunomodulation and eventual metastasis. Many of these changes may support neoplastic progression, and unique alterations in tumor-associated glycosylation may also serve as a distinct feature of cancer cells and therefore provide novel diagnostic and even therapeutic targets.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45212  
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Author Robertson, I.B.; Horiguchi, M.; Zilberberg, L.; Dabovic, B.; Hadjiolova, K.; Rifkin, D.B. url  openurl
  Title Latent TGF-β-binding proteins Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Matrix Biol  
  Volume 47 Issue (up) Pages 44-53  
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  Abstract The LTBPs (or latent transforming growth factor β binding proteins) are important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that interact with fibrillin microfibrils and have a number of different roles in microfibril biology. There are four LTBPs isoforms in the human genome (LTBP-1, -2, -3, and -4), all of which appear to associate with fibrillin and the biology of each isoform is reviewed here. The LTBPs were first identified as forming latent complexes with TGFβ by covalently binding the TGFβ propeptide (LAP) via disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum. LAP in turn is cleaved from the mature TGFβ precursor in the trans-golgi network but LAP and TGFβ remain strongly bound through non-covalent interactions. LAP, TGFβ, and LTBP together form the large latent complex (LLC). LTBPs were originally thought to primarily play a role in maintaining TGFβ latency and targeting the latent growth factor to the extracellular matrix (ECM), but it has also been shown that LTBP-1 participates in TGFβ activation by integrins and may also regulate activation by proteases and other factors. LTBP-3 appears to have a role in skeletal formation including tooth development. As well as having important functions in TGFβ regulation, TGFβ-independent activities have recently been identified for LTBP-2 and LTBP-4 in stabilizing microfibril bundles and regulating elastic fiber assembly.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45253  
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Author Van Gool, B.; Dedieu, S.; Emonard, H.; Roebroek, A.J. url  openurl
  Title The Matricellular Receptor LRP1 Forms an Interface for Signaling and Endocytosis in Modulation of the Extracellular Tumor Environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Front Pharmacol  
  Volume 6 Issue (up) Pages 271  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The membrane protein low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1) has been attributed a role in cancer. However, its presumably often indirect involvement is far from understood. LRP1 has both endocytic and signaling activities. As a matricellular receptor it is involved in regulation, mostly by clearing, of various extracellular matrix degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, serine proteases, protease inhibitor complexes, and the endoglycosidase heparanase. Furthermore, by binding extracellular ligands including growth factors and subsequent intracellular interaction with scaffolding and adaptor proteins it is involved in regulation of various signaling cascades. LRP1 expression levels are often downregulated in cancer and some studies consider low LRP1 levels a poor prognostic factor. On the contrary, upregulation in brain cancers has been noted and clinical trials explore the use of LRP1 as cargo receptor to deliver cytotoxic agents. This mini-review focuses on LRP1’s role in tumor growth and metastasis especially by modulation of the extracellular tumor environment. In relation to this role its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential will be discussed.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45275  
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Author Rutten, M.J.; Sonke, G.S.; Westermann, A.M.; van Driel, W.J.; Trum, J.W.; Kenter, G.G.; Buist, M.R. url  openurl
  Title Prognostic Value of Residual Disease after Interval Debulking Surgery for FIGO Stage IIIC and IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Obstet Gynecol Int  
  Volume 2015 Issue (up) Pages 464123  
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  Abstract Although complete debulking surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is more often achieved with interval debulking surgery (IDS) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), randomized evidence shows no long-term survival benefit compared to complete primary debulking surgery (PDS). We performed an observational cohort study of patients treated with debulking surgery for advanced EOC to evaluate the prognostic value of residual disease after debulking surgery. All patients treated between 1998 and 2010 in three Dutch referral gynaecological oncology centres were included. The prognostic value of residual disease after surgery for disease specific survival was assessed using Cox-regression analyses. In total, 462 patients underwent NACT-IDS and 227 PDS. Macroscopic residual disease after debulking surgery was an independent prognostic factor for survival in both treatment modalities. Yet, residual tumour less than one centimetre at IDS was associated with a survival benefit of five months compared to leaving residual tumour more than one centimetre, whereas this benefit was not seen after PDS. Leaving residual tumour at IDS is a poor prognostic sign as it is after PDS. The specific prognostic value of residual tumour seems to depend on the clinical setting, as minimal instead of gross residual tumour is associated with improved survival after IDS, but not after PDS.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45336  
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