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Author Amendola, L.M.; Dorschner, M.O.; Robertson, P.D.; Salama, J.S.; Hart, R.; Shirts, B.H.; Murray, M.L.; Tokita, M.J.; Gallego, C.J.; Kim, D.S.; Bennett, J.T.; Crosslin, D.R.; Ranchalis, J.; Jones, K.L.; Rosenthal, E.A.; Jarvik, E.R.; Itsara, A.; Turner, E.H.; Herman, D.S.; Schleit, J.; Burt, A.; Jamal, S.M.; Abrudan, J.L.; Johnson, A.D.; Conlin, L.K.; Dulik, M.C.; Santani, A.; Metterville, D.R.; Kelly, M.; Foreman, A.K.; Lee, K.; Taylor, K.D.; Guo, X.; Crooks, K.; Kiedrowski, L.A.; Raffel, L.J.; Gordon, O.; Machini, K.; Desnick, R.J.; Biesecker, L.G.; Lubitz, S.A.; Mulchandani, S.; Cooper, G.M.; Joffe, S.; Richards, C.S.; Yang, Y.; Rotter, J.I.; Rich, S.S.; O’Donnell, C.J.; Berg, J.S.; Spinner, N.B.; Evans, J.P.; Fullerton, S.M.; Leppig, K.A.; Bennett, R.L.; Bird, T.; Sybert, V.P.; Grady, W.M.; Tabor, H.K.; Kim, J.H.; Bamshad, M.J.; Wilfond, B.; Motulsky, A.G.; Scott, C.R.; Pritchard, C.C.; Walsh, T.D.; Burke, W.; Raskind, W.H.; Byers, P.; Hisama, F.M.; Rehm, H.; Nickerson, D.A.; Jarvik, G.P. url  openurl
  Title Actionable exomic incidental findings in 6503 participants: challenges of variant classification Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Genome Res  
  Volume (down) 25 Issue 3 Pages 305-315  
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  Abstract Recommendations for laboratories to report incidental findings from genomic tests have stimulated interest in such results. In order to investigate the criteria and processes for assigning the pathogenicity of specific variants and to estimate the frequency of such incidental findings in patients of European and African ancestry, we classified potentially actionable pathogenic single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in all 4300 European- and 2203 African-ancestry participants sequenced by the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project (ESP). We considered 112 gene-disease pairs selected by an expert panel as associated with medically actionable genetic disorders that may be undiagnosed in adults. The resulting classifications were compared to classifications from other clinical and research genetic testing laboratories, as well as with in silico pathogenicity scores. Among European-ancestry participants, 30 of 4300 (0.7%) had a pathogenic SNV and six (0.1%) had a disruptive variant that was expected to be pathogenic, whereas 52 (1.2%) had likely pathogenic SNVs. For African-ancestry participants, six of 2203 (0.3%) had a pathogenic SNV and six (0.3%) had an expected pathogenic disruptive variant, whereas 13 (0.6%) had likely pathogenic SNVs. Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling mammalian conservation score and the Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion summary score of conservation, substitution, regulation, and other evidence were compared across pathogenicity assignments and appear to have utility in variant classification. This work provides a refined estimate of the burden of adult onset, medically actionable incidental findings expected from exome sequencing, highlights challenges in variant classification, and demonstrates the need for a better curated variant interpretation knowledge base.  
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  ISSN 1088-9051 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45831  
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Author Ford, J.D.; Mendelsohn, M.; Opler, L.A.; Opler, M.G.A.; Kallivayalil, D.; Levitan, J.; Pratts, M.; Muenzenmaier, K.; Shelley, A.-M.; Grennan, M.S.; Lewis Herman, J. url  doi
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  Title The Symptoms of Trauma Scale (SOTS): An Initial Psychometric Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Psychiatric Practice Abbreviated Journal J Psychiatr Pract  
  Volume (down) 21 Issue 6 Pages 474-483  
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  Abstract The Symptoms of Trauma Scale (SOTS) is a 12-item, interview-based, clinician-rated measure that assesses the severity of a range of trauma-related symptoms. This pilot study evaluated its use and psychometric properties in an outpatient setting that provides treatment to survivors of chronic interpersonal trauma. Thirty participants completed self-report measures of posttraumatic stress symptoms, depression, dissociation, self-esteem, and affect dysregulation; the participants also participated separately in a semistructured interview based on the SOTS conducted by 2 trained interviewers. SOTS composite severity scores for DSM-IV posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and complex PTSD (cPTSD), DSM-5 PTSD, and PTSD dissociative subtype, and total traumatic stress symptoms generally had acceptable internal consistency and interrater reliability. Evidence of convergent, discriminant, criterion, and construct validity was found for the SOTS composite PTSD scores, although potential limitations to validity that require further research and refinement of the measure were identified for the SOTS total and DSM-IV cPTSD scores and the hyperarousal, affect dysregulation, and dissociation items. Interviewers and interviewees described the interview as efficient, informative, and well tolerated. Implications for clinical practice and research to refine the SOTS are discussed.  
  Address FORD: Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT MENDELSOHN, KALLIVAYALIL, and HERMAN: Department of Psychiatry, Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA L.A. OPLER: Department of Psychology, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY M.G.A. OPLER: ProPhase LLC, Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, and Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY LEVITAN: Synergy Psychological, Sierra Madre, CA PRATTS: St Joseph's Hospital Health Center, Syracuse, NY MUENZENMAIER: Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY SHELLEY: Bronx Psychiatric Center, Bronx, NY GRENNAN: ProPhase LLC, New York, NY  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1527-4160 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:26554331 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42171  
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Author Anderson-Teixeira, K.J.; Davies, S.J.; Bennett, A.C.; Gonzalez-Akre, E.B.; Muller-Landau, H.C.; Joseph Wright, S.; Abu Salim, K.; Almeyda Zambrano, A.M.; Alonso, A.; Baltzer, J.L.; Basset, Y.; Bourg, N.A.; Broadbent, E.N.; Brockelman, W.Y.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Burslem, D.F.R.P.; Butt, N.; Cao, M.; Cardenas, D.; Chuyong, G.B.; Clay, K.; Cordell, S.; Dattaraja, H.S.; Deng, X.; Detto, M.; Du, X.; Duque, A.; Erikson, D.L.; Ewango, C.E.N.; Fischer, G.A.; Fletcher, C.; Foster, R.B.; Giardina, C.P.; Gilbert, G.S.; Gunatilleke, N.; Gunatilleke, S.; Hao, Z.; Hargrove, W.W.; Hart, T.B.; Hau, B.C.H.; He, F.; Hoffman, F.M.; Howe, R.W.; Hubbell, S.P.; Inman-Narahari, F.M.; Jansen, P.A.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, D.J.; Kanzaki, M.; Kassim, A.R.; Kenfack, D.; Kibet, S.; Kinnaird, M.F.; Korte, L.; Kral, K.; Kumar, J.; Larson, A.J.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Liu, S.; Lum, S.K.Y.; Lutz, J.A.; Ma, K.; Maddalena, D.M.; Makana, J.-R.; Malhi, Y.; Marthews, T.; Mat Serudin, R.; McMahon, S.M.; McShea, W.J.; Memiaghe, H.R.; Mi, X.; Mizuno, T.; Morecroft, M.; Myers, J.A.; Novotny, V.; de Oliveira, A.A.; Ong, P.S.; Orwig, D.A.; Ostertag, R.; den Ouden, J.; Parker, G.G.; Phillips, R.P.; Sack, L.; Sainge, M.N.; Sang, W.; Sri-ngernyuang, K.; Sukumar, R.; Sun, I.-F.; Sungpalee, W.; Suresh, H.S.; Tan, S.; Thomas, S.C.; Thomas, D.W.; Thompson, J.; Turner, B.L.; Uriarte, M.; Valencia, R.; Vallejo, M.I.; Vicentini, A.; Vrška, T.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.; Weiblen, G.; Wolf, A.; Xu, H.; Yap, S.; Zimmerman, J. doi  openurl
  Title CTFS-ForestGEO: a worldwide network monitoring forests in an era of global change Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Global Change Biology  
  Volume (down) 21 Issue 2 Pages 528-549  
  Keywords biodiversity; Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS); climate change; demography; forest dynamics plot; Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO); long-term monitoring; spatial analysis  
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  ISSN 1365-2486 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43015  
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Author Kadiyska, T.; Nossikoff, A. url  openurl
  Title Stool DNA methylation assays in colorectal cancer screening Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal World J Gastroenterol  
  Volume (down) 21 Issue 35 Pages 10057-10061  
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  Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC) is fourth most common cancer in men and third in women worldwide. Developing a diagnostic panel of sensitive and specific biomarkers for the early detection of CRC is recognised as to be crucial for early initial diagnosis, which in turn leads to better long term survival. Most of the research on novel potential CRC biomarkers in the last 2 decades has been focussed on stool DNA analysis. In this paper, we describe the recent advances in non-invasive CRC screening and more specifically in molecular assays for aberrantly methylated BMP3 and NDRG4 promoter regions. In several research papers these markers showed superior rates for sensitivity and specificity in comparison to previously described assays. These tests detected the majority of adenomas ≥ 1 cm in size and the detection rates progressively increased with larger adenomas. The methylation status of the BMP3 and NDRG4 promoters demonstrated effective detection of neoplasms at all sites throughout the colon and was not affected by common clinical variables. Recently, a multitarget stool DNA test consisting of molecular assays for aberrantly methylated BMP3 and NDRG4 promoter regions, mutant KRAS and immunochemical assay for human haemoglobin has been made commercially available and is currently reimbursed in the United States. Although this is the most sensitive non-invasive CRC screening test, there is the need for further research in several areas – establishment of the best timeframe for repeated DNA stool testing; validation of the results in populations outside of North America; usefulness for surveillance and prognosis of patients; cost-effectiveness of DNA stool testing in real-life populations.  
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  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45144  
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Author Blume-Jensen, P.; Berman, D.M.; Rimm, D.L.; Shipitsin, M.; Putzi, M.; Nifong, T.P.; Small, C.; Choudhury, S.; Capela, T.; Coupal, L.; Ernst, C.; Hurley, A.; Kaprelyants, A.; Chang, H.; Giladi, E.; Nardone, J.; Dunyak, J.; Loda, M.; Klein, E.A.; Magi-Galluzzi, C.; Latour, M.; Epstein, J.I.; Kantoff, P.; Saad, F. url  openurl
  Title Development and clinical validation of an in situ biopsy-based multimarker assay for risk stratification in prostate cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Clin Cancer Res  
  Volume (down) 21 Issue 11 Pages 2591-2600  
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  Abstract PURPOSE: Prostate cancer aggressiveness and appropriate therapy are routinely determined following biopsy sampling. Current clinical and pathologic parameters are insufficient for accurate risk prediction leading primarily to overtreatment and also missed opportunities for curative therapy. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: An 8-biomarker proteomic assay for intact tissue biopsies predictive of prostate pathology was defined in a study of 381 patient biopsies with matched prostatectomy specimens. A second blinded study of 276 cases validated this assay’s ability to distinguish “favorable” versus “nonfavorable” pathology independently and relative to current risk classification systems National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN and D’Amico). RESULTS: A favorable biomarker risk score of ≤0.33, and a nonfavorable risk score of >0.80 (possible range between 0 and 1) were defined on “false-negative” and “false-positive” rates of 10% and 5%, respectively. At a risk score ≤0.33, predictive values for favorable pathology in very low-risk and low-risk NCCN and low-risk D’Amico groups were 95%, 81.5%, and 87.2%, respectively, higher than for these current risk classification groups themselves (80.3%, 63.8%, and 70.6%, respectively). The predictive value for nonfavorable pathology was 76.9% at biomarker risk scores >0.8 across all risk groups. Increased biomarker risk scores correlated with decreased frequency of favorable cases across all risk groups. The validation study met its two coprimary endpoints, separating favorable from nonfavorable pathology (AUC, 0.68; P < 0.0001; OR, 20.9) and GS-6 versus non-GS-6 pathology (AUC, 0.65; P < 0.0001; OR, 12.95). CONCLUSIONS: The 8-biomarker assay provided individualized, independent prognostic information relative to current risk stratification systems, and may improve the precision of clinical decision making following prostate biopsy.  
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  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 45258  
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Author Guttal, V. openurl 
  Title Classroom: Discovering facts – Finding the Longest Day with School Children Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Resonance  
  Volume (down) 20 Issue 3 Pages 254-259  
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  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43017  
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Author Scalisi, R.G.; Paleari, M.; Favetto, A.; Stoppa, M.; Ariano, P.; Pandolfi, P.; Chiolerio, A. url  openurl
  Title Inkjet printed flexible electrodes for surface electromyography Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Organic Electronics: physics, materials, applications  
  Volume (down) 18 Issue Pages 89-94  
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  Notes Cited By :3; Export Date: 2 November 2016 Approved no  
  Call Number IIT-CSF @ alessandro.chiolerio @ Serial 42784  
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Author Jazaieri, H.; Morrison, A.S.; Goldin, P.R.; Gross, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of emotion and emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Current Psychiatry Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Psychiatry Rep  
  Volume (down) 17 Issue 1 Pages 531  
  Keywords Anxiety Disorders/*psychology/*therapy; Cognitive Therapy/methods; *Emotions; Humans; Internal-External Control; Mindfulness/methods; *Social Behavior  
  Abstract Many psychiatric disorders involve problematic patterns of emotional reactivity and regulation. In this review, we consider recent findings regarding emotion and emotion regulation in the context of social anxiety disorder (SAD). We first describe key features of SAD which suggest altered emotional and self-related processing difficulties. Next, we lay the conceptual foundation for a discussion of emotion and emotion regulation and present a common framework for understanding emotion regulation, the process model of emotion regulation. Using the process model, we evaluate the recent empirical literature spanning self-report, observational, behavioral, and physiological methods across five specific families of emotion regulation processes-situation selection, situation modification, attentional deployment, cognitive change, and response modulation. Next, we examine the empirical evidence behind two psychosocial interventions for SAD: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR). Throughout, we present suggestions for future directions in the continued examination of emotion and emotion regulation in SAD.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Institute of Personality and Social Research, University of California, Berkeley, 4152 Tolman Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720-1650, USA, hooria@berkeley.edu  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1523-3812 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:25413637 Approved no  
  Call Number UC @ arin.basu @ Serial 42596  
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Author ACMG, B. of D. url  openurl
  Title ACMG policy statement: updated recommendations regarding analysis and reporting of secondary findings in clinical genome-scale sequencing Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Genet Med  
  Volume (down) 17 Issue 1 Pages 68-69  
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  Abstract DISCLAIMER: These recommendations are designed primarily as an educational resource for medical geneticists and other health-care providers to help them provide quality medical genetics services. Adherence to these recommendations does not necessarily ensure a successful medical outcome. These recommendations should not be considered inclusive of all proper procedures and tests or exclusive of other procedures and tests that are reasonably directed to obtaining the same results. In determining the propriety of any specific procedure or test, geneticists and other clinicians should apply their own professional judgment to the specific clinical circumstances presented by the individual patient or specimen. It may be prudent, however, to document in the patient’s record the rationale for any significant deviation from these recommendations.  
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  ISSN 1098-3600 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45436  
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Author Frewen, P.; Hegadoren, K.; Coupland, N.J.; Rowe, B.H.; Neufeld, R.W.J.; Lanius, R. url  doi
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  Title Trauma-Related Altered States of Consciousness (TRASC) and Functional Impairment I: Prospective Study in Acutely Traumatized Persons Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Trauma & Dissociation : the Official Journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation (ISSD) Abbreviated Journal J Trauma Dissociation  
  Volume (down) 16 Issue 5 Pages 500-519  
  Keywords 4-D model; childhood abuse and neglect; dissociation; posttraumatic stress disorder; trauma-related altered states of consciousness  
  Abstract A theoretical framework referred to as a 4-D model has been described for classifying posttraumatic stress symptoms into those potentially occurring within normal waking consciousness (NWC) versus those thought to intrinsically exemplify dissociative experiences, specifically, trauma-related altered states of consciousness (TRASC). As a further test of this theoretical distinction, this prospective study evaluated whether TRASC and NWC forms of distress incrementally and prospectively predicted functional impairment at 6 and 12 weeks following presentation at hospital emergency departments in the acute aftermath of traumatic events in 180 persons. Establishing the clinical significance of both TRASC and NWC-distress symptoms, we found that 6-week markers of TRASC and NWC-distress independently predicted 12-week self-reported levels of social and occupational impairment. We also observed broad support for various predictions of the 4-D model except that, in contrast with hypotheses, childhood trauma history was generally more strongly correlated with symptoms of NWC-distress than with TRASC. Future research directions are discussed.  
  Address f Department of Psychiatry and Graduate Program in Neuroscience , Western University , London , Ontario , Canada  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1529-9732 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:26378486 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42174  
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