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Author Rajaraman, K.; Godthi, V.; Pratap, R.; Balakrishnan, R. url  openurl
  Title A novel acoustic-vibratory multimodal duet Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal J. Exp. Biol.  
  Volume (down) 218 Issue 19 Pages 3042  
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  Abstract The communication strategy of most crickets and bushcrickets typically consists of males broadcasting loud acoustic calling songs, while females perform phonotaxis, moving towards the source of the call. Males of the pseudophylline bushcricket species Onomarchus uninotatus produce an unusually low-pitched call, and we found that the immediate and most robust response of females to the male acoustic call was a bodily vibration, or tremulation, following each syllable of the call. We hypothesized that these bodily oscillations might send out a vibrational signal along the substrate on which the female stands, which males could use to localize her position. We quantified these vibrational signals using a laser vibrometer and found a clear phase relationship of alternation between the chirps of the male acoustic call and the female vibrational response. This system therefore constitutes a novel multimodal duet with a reliable temporal structure. We also found that males could localize the source of vibration but only if both the acoustic and vibratory components of the duet were played back. This unique multimodal duetting system may have evolved in response to higher levels of bat predation on searching bushcricket females than calling males, shifting part of the risk associated with partner localization onto the male. This is the first known example of bushcricket female tremulation in response to a long-range male acoustic signal and the first known example of a multimodal duet among animals.  
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  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43000  
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Author Steenweg, R.J.; Hennin, H.L.; Bêty, J.; Gilchrist, H.G.; Williams, T.D.; Crossin, G.T.; Love, O.P. url  openurl
  Title Sources of diel variation in energetic physiology in an Arctic-breeding, diving seaduck Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal General and Comparative Endocrinology  
  Volume (down) 216 Issue Pages 39-45  
  Keywords Arctic; Corticosterone; Diel rhythm; Energetic physiology; Sea duck; Triglyceride  
  Abstract Diel variation in baseline glucocorticoid (GC) secretion influences energetics and foraging behaviors. In temperate breeding, diurnal vertebrates, studies have shown that daily patterns of baseline GC secretion are influenced by environmental photoperiod, with baseline GCs peaking prior to sunrise to stimulate waking and foraging behaviors. Measures of physiological energy acquisition are also expected to peak in response to foraging activity, but their relationship to GC levels have not been well studied. In contrast to temperate breeding species, virtually nothing is known about diel GC and energetic metabolite secretion in Arctic breeding species, which experience almost constant photoperiods in spring and summer. Using a ten-year dataset, we examined the daily, 24-h pattern of baseline corticosterone (CORT) and triglyceride (TRIG) secretion in approximately 800 female pre-breeding Arctic-nesting common eiders (. Somateria mollissima). We related these traits to environmental photoperiod and to tidal cycle. In contrast to temperate breeding species, we found that that neither time of day nor tidal trend predicted diel variation in CORT or TRIG secretion in Arctic-breeding eiders. Given the narrow window of opportunity for breeding in polar regions, we suggest that eiders must decouple their daily foraging activity from light and tidal cycles if they are to accrue sufficient energy for successful breeding. As CORT is known to influence foraging behavior, the absence of a distinct diel pattern of CORT secretion may therefore be an adaptation to optimize reproductive investment and likelihood for success in some polar-breeding species. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.  
  Address Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada  
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  Notes Export Date: 17 March 2016 Approved no  
  Call Number McgGll @ elizabethburgess @ Serial 42530  
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Author Sangermano, M.; Buzzerio, G.; Rizzoli, R.; Ortolani, L.; Morandi, V.; Pirri, F.; Chiolerio, A. url  openurl
  Title Enhanced performance of graphene-epoxy flexible capacitors by means of ceramic fillers Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics  
  Volume (down) 216 Issue 7 Pages 707-713  
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  Notes Cited By :2; Export Date: 2 November 2016 Approved no  
  Call Number IIT-CSF @ alessandro.chiolerio @ Serial 42783  
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Author Briere, J.; Runtz, M. url  doi
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  Title Dissociation in individuals denying trauma exposure: findings from two samples Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease Abbreviated Journal J Nerv Ment Dis  
  Volume (down) 203 Issue 6 Pages 439-442  
  Keywords Adult; Affective Symptoms/*psychology; Aged; Dissociative Disorders/*psychology; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Young Adult  
  Abstract A number of studies suggest that dissociation is reliably related to trauma exposure, and that inadequate regulation of posttraumatic distress may be a significant factor. We examined whether affect dysregulation predicts dissociation in those denying any lifetime exposure to trauma. These relationships were evaluated in a general population sample and a second sample of nontraumatized university students. In the first study, multivariate analyses indicated that, along with gender, affect dysregulation was a relatively strong predictor, accounting for 27% of the variance in dissociation. In the replication study, dissociation was associated with affect dysregulation, but not gender. Affect dysregulation seems to predict dissociative symptomatology in nontraumatized individuals. It is hypothesized that emotional distress, whether from trauma or other etiologies, motivates dissociation to the extent that it challenges the individual's compromised capacity for affect regulation. Treatment implications may include the potential helpfulness of interventions that increase emotion regulation skills.  
  Address *Departments of Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences and Psychology, Keck School of Medicine University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; and daggerDepartment of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada  
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  ISSN 0022-3018 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:25974057 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42185  
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Author Schmidt, A.K.D.; Balakrishnan, R. doi  openurl
  Title Ecology of acoustic signalling and the problem of masking interference in insects Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Journal of Comparative Physiology A  
  Volume (down) 201 Issue 1 Pages 133-142  
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  Abstract The efficiency of long-distance acoustic signalling of insects in their natural habitat is constrained in several ways. Acoustic signals are not only subjected to changes imposed by the physical structure of the habitat such as attenuation and degradation but also to masking interference from co-occurring signals of other acoustically communicating species. Masking interference is likely to be a ubiquitous problem in multi-species assemblages, but successful communication in natural environments under noisy conditions suggests powerful strategies to deal with the detection and recognition of relevant signals. In this review we present recent work on the role of the habitat as a driving force in shaping insect signal structures. In the context of acoustic masking interference, we discuss the ecological niche concept and examine the role of acoustic resource partitioning in the temporal, spatial and spectral domains as sender strategies to counter masking. We then examine the efficacy of different receiver strategies: physiological mechanisms such as frequency tuning, spatial release from masking and gain control as useful strategies to counteract acoustic masking. We also review recent work on the effects of anthropogenic noise on insect acoustic communication and the importance of insect sounds as indicators of biodiversity and ecosystem health.  
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  ISSN 1432-1351 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 42988  
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Author Mandal, S.; Gadagkar, R. doi  openurl
  Title Homing abilities of the tropical primitively eusocial paper wasp Ropalidia marginata Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Journal of Comparative Physiology A  
  Volume (down) 201 Issue 8 Pages 795-802  
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  Abstract Compared to our extensive knowledge about the navigation and homing abilities of ants and bees, we know rather little about these phenomena in social wasps. Here, we report the homing abilities of the tropical primitively eusocial wasp Ropalidia marginata and the factors that affect their homing success. To determine from how far these wasps can return to their nests, we transported foragers blindfold and released them at gradually increasing distances from their nests in four cardinal directions. Their homing success was determined by checking their presence on their nests on three consecutive nights. All foragers (56 individuals, 115 releases) returned back from an area of 0.73 ± 0.25 km2 on the day of release (minimal homing area), whereas 83.8 % of the foragers (217 individuals, 420 releases) returned when we enlarged the area of release to 6.22 ± 0.66 km2 around their nests (maximal homing area). Of 66 releases, no wasps returned from beyond the maximal homing area. The minimal homing area might be familiar to the foragers because they probably routinely forage in this area and the maximal homing area represents the maximum distances from which the wasps are capable of returning to their nests, with or without familiarity.  
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  ISSN 1432-1351 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43021  
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Author Varma, V.; Ratnam, J.; Viswanathan, V.; Osuri, A.M.; Biesmeijer, J.C.; Madhusudan, M.D.; Sankaran, M.; Krishnadas, M.; Barua, D.; Budruk, M.; Isvaran, K.; Jayapal, R.; Joshi, J.; Karanth, K.K.; Krishnaswamy, J.; Kumar, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Nagendra, H.; Niphadkar, M.; Owen, N.; Page, N.; Prasad, S.; Quader, S.; Nandini, R.; Robin, V.V.; Sait, S.M.; Shah, M.A.; Somanathan, H.; Srinivasan, U.; Sundaram, B. url  openurl
  Title Perceptions of priority issues in the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystems in India Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 187 Issue Pages 201-211  
  Keywords biodiversity; Conservation; Ecosystems; India; Perceptions  
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  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 42955  
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Author Krishnan, A.; Ghara, M.; Kasinathan, S.; Pramanik, G.K.; Revadi, S.; Borges, R.M. doi  openurl
  Title Plant reproductive traits mediate tritrophic feedback effects within an obligate brood-site pollination mutualism Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Oecologia  
  Volume (down) 179 Issue 3 Pages 797-809  
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  Abstract Plants, herbivores and parasitoids affect each other directly and indirectly; however, feedback effects mediated by host plant traits have rarely been demonstrated in these tritrophic interactions. Brood-site pollination mutualisms (e.g. those involving figs and fig wasps) represent specialised tritrophic communities where the progeny of mutualistic pollinators and of non-mutualistic gallers (both herbivores) together with that of their parasitoids develop within enclosed inflorescences called syconia (hence termed brood-sites or microcosms). Plant reproductive phenology (which affects temporal brood-site availability) and inflorescence size (representing brood-site size) are plant traits that could affect reproductive resources, and hence relationships between trees, pollinators and non-pollinating wasps. Analysing wasp and seed contents of syconia, we examined direct, indirect, trophic and non-trophic relationships within the interaction web of the fig–fig wasp community of Ficus racemosa in the context of brood site size and availability. We demonstrate that in addition to direct resource competition and predator–prey (host–parasitoid) interactions, these communities display exploitative or apparent competition and trait-mediated indirect interactions. Inflorescence size and plant reproductive phenology impacted plant–herbivore and plant–parasitoid associations. These plant traits also influenced herbivore–herbivore and herbivore–parasitoid relationships via indirect effects. Most importantly, we found a reciprocal effect between within-tree reproductive asynchrony and fig wasp progeny abundances per syconium that drives a positive feedback cycle within the system. The impact of a multitrophic feedback cycle within a community built around a mutualistic core highlights the need for a holistic view of plant–herbivore–parasitoid interactions in the community ecology of mutualisms.  
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  ISSN 1432-1939 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number CES @ dilipnaidu.gt @ Serial 43113  
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Author Hennin, H.L.; Legagneux, P.; Bêty, J.; Williams, T.D.; Grant Gilchrist, H.; Baker, T.M.; Love, O.P. url  openurl
  Title Pre-breeding energetic management in a mixed-strategy breeder Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Oecologia  
  Volume (down) 177 Issue 1 Pages 235-243  
  Keywords Breeding threshold; Corticosterone; Energetic management; Energetic metabolites; Mixed-strategy breeder  
  Abstract Integrative biologists have long appreciated that the effective acquisition and management of energy prior to breeding should strongly influence fitness-related reproductive decisions (timing of breeding and reproductive investment). However, because of the difficulty in capturing pre-breeding individuals, and the tendency towards abandonment of reproduction after capture, we know little about the underlying mechanisms of these life-history decisions. Over 10 years, we captured free-living, arctic-breeding common eiders (Somateria mollissima) up to 3 weeks before investment in reproduction. We examined and characterized physiological parameters predicted to influence energetic management by sampling baseline plasma glucocorticoids (i.e., corticosterone), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and vitellogenin (VTG) for their respective roles in mediating energetic balance, rate of condition gain (physiological fattening rate) and reproductive investment. Baseline corticosterone increased significantly from arrival to the initiation of reproductive investment (period of rapid follicular growth; RFG), and showed a positive relationship with body mass, indicating that this hormone may stimulate foraging behaviour to facilitate both fat deposition and investment in egg production. In support of this, we found that VLDL increased throughout the pre-breeding period, peaking as predicted during RFG. Female eiders exhibited unprecedentedly high levels of VTG well before their theoretical RFG period, a potential strategy for pre-emptively depositing available protein stores into follicles while females are simultaneously fattening. This study provides some of the first data examining the temporal dynamics and interaction of the energetic mechanisms thought to be at the heart of individual variation in reproductive decisions and success in many vertebrate species. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.  
  Address Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada  
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  Notes Cited By :1; Export Date: 17 March 2016 Approved no  
  Call Number McgGll @ elizabethburgess @ Serial 42531  
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Author Hein, M. Y.; Hubner, N. C.; Poser, I.; Cox, J.; Nagaraj, N.; Toyoda, Y.; Gak, I. A.; Weisswange, I.; Mansfeld, J.; Buchholz, F.; Hyman, A. A.; Mann, M. doi  openurl
  Title A Human Interactome in Three Quantitative Dimensions Organized by Stoichiometries and Abundances Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Cell  
  Volume (down) 163 Issue 3 Pages 712-723  
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  Abstract Summary The organization of a cell emerges from the interactions in protein networks. The interactome is critically dependent on the strengths of interactions and the cellular abundances of the connected proteins, both of which span orders of magnitude. However, these aspects have not yet been analyzed globally. Here, we have generated a library of HeLa cell lines expressing 1,125 GFP-tagged proteins under near-endogenous control, which we used as input for a next-generation interaction survey. Using quantitative proteomics, we detect specific interactions, estimate interaction stoichiometries, and measure cellular abundances of interacting proteins. These three quantitative dimensions reveal that the protein network is dominated by weak, substoichiometric interactions that play a pivotal role in defining network topology. The minority of stable complexes can be identified by their unique stoichiometry signature. This study provides a rich interaction dataset connecting thousands of proteins and introduces a framework for quantitative network analysis.  
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  ISSN 1097-4172 (Electronic)\textbackslash\r0092-8674 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Times cited: 690 Approved no  
  Call Number AG @ matthewjvarga @ Serial 46438  
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