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Author Hansen, M.; Armour, C.; Wang, L.; Elklit, A.; Bryant, R.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing possible DSM-5 ASD subtypes in a sample of victims meeting caseness for DSM-5 ASD based on self-report following multiple forms of traumatic exposure Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Anxiety Disorders Abbreviated Journal J Anxiety Disord  
  Volume (down) 31 Issue Pages 84-89  
  Keywords Crime Victims/*psychology; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; Disaster Victims/*psychology; Dissociative Disorders/diagnosis; Female; Humans; Male; Rape/psychology; Self Report; Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/*diagnosis/psychology; Violence/psychology; ASD subtypes; Acute stress disorder; Dsm-5; Icd-11; Latent profile analysis  
  Abstract Acute stress disorder (ASD) was introduced into the DSM-IV to recognize early traumatic responses and as a precursor of PTSD. Although the diagnostic criteria for ASD were altered and structured more similarly to the PTSD definition in DSM-5, only the PTSD diagnosis includes a dissociative subtype. Emerging research has indicated that there also appears to be a highly symptomatic subtype for ASD. However, the specific nature of the subtype is currently unclear. The present study investigates the possible presence of ASD subtypes in a mixed sample of victims meeting caseness for DSM-5 ASD based on self-report following four different types of traumatic exposure (N=472). The results of latent profile analysis revealed a 5-class solution. The highly symptomatic class was marked by high endorsement on avoidance and dissociation compared to the other classes. Findings are discussed in regard to its clinical implications including the implications for the pending the ICD-11 and the recently released DSM-5.  
  Address School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia  
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  ISSN 0887-6185 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:25768397 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42192  
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Author Alkuraya, F.S. url  openurl
  Title Human knockout research: new horizons and opportunities Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Trends Genet  
  Volume (down) 31 Issue 2 Pages 108-115  
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  Abstract Although numerous approaches have been pursued to understand the function of human genes, Mendelian genetics has by far provided the most compelling and medically actionable dataset. Biallelic loss-of-function (LOF) mutations are observed in the majority of autosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, representing natural human knockouts and offering a unique opportunity to study the physiological and developmental context of these genes. The restriction of such context to ‘disease’ states is artificial, however, and the recent ability to survey entire human genomes for biallelic LOF mutations has revealed a surprising landscape of knockout events in ‘healthy’ individuals, sparking interest in their role in phenotypic diversity beyond disease causation. As I discuss in this review, the potentially wide implications of human knockout research warrant increased investment and multidisciplinary collaborations to overcome existing challenges and reap its benefits.  
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  ISSN 0168-9525 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45506  
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Author Andersson, R.; Sandelin, A.; Danko, C.G. url  openurl
  Title A unified architecture of transcriptional regulatory elements Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Trends Genet  
  Volume (down) 31 Issue 8 Pages 426-433  
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  Abstract Gene expression is precisely controlled in time and space through the integration of signals that act at gene promoters and gene-distal enhancers. Classically, promoters and enhancers are considered separate classes of regulatory elements, often distinguished by histone modifications. However, recent studies have revealed broad similarities between enhancers and promoters, blurring the distinction: active enhancers often initiate transcription, and some gene promoters have the potential to enhance transcriptional output of other promoters. Here, we propose a model in which promoters and enhancers are considered a single class of functional element, with a unified architecture for transcription initiation. The context of interacting regulatory elements and the surrounding sequences determine local transcriptional output as well as the enhancer and promoter activities of individual elements.  
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  ISSN 0168-9525 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45626  
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Author Thomson, P.; Jaque, S.V. url  openurl
  Title Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Psychopathology in Dancers Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Medical Problems of Performing Artists Abbreviated Journal Med Probl Perform Art  
  Volume (down) 30 Issue 3 Pages 157-162  
  Keywords Adult; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dancing/*psychology; Depression/epidemiology/psychology; Female; Humans; Male; Mental Health/*statistics & numerical data; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Occupational Diseases/epidemiology/*psychology; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology/*psychology; Stress, Psychological/epidemiology/psychology; Young Adult  
  Abstract This study investigated the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in pre-professional and professional dancers (n=209) who were exposed to traumatic events. Nine self-report instruments assessed (1) adverse childhood experiences, (2) past traumatic events, (3) coping strategies under stressful situations, and (4) fantasy proneness. The psychopathology variables included (5) anxiety, (6) depression, (7) dissociation, (8) shame, and (9)) PTSD diagnostic scale. Statistical calculations included descriptive, distributional, and multivariate analysis of covariates (MANCOVA). Results indicate that dancers had a significantly higher distribution of PTSD (20.2%) compared to the normal population (7.8%). They also had a higher frequency of family members with mental illness, an inability to speak about their trauma, and more suicidal thoughts. The PTSD group of dancers had higher levels of psychopathology (anxiety, depression, dissociation, and shame) and they had more childhood adversity and adult trauma. Compared to the no-PTSD group, the PTSD group had higher scores on fantasy proneness and emotion-oriented coping strategies. These coping strategies may increase psychological instability. Addressing early abuse and trauma is recommended. Clinicians may help dancers alter their internal working models that their self is worthless, others are abusive, and the world is threatening and dangerous. By understanding PTSD in dancers, medical and mental health treatment protocols may be established to address the debilitating, and often hidden, symptoms of PTSD.  
  Address Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge, CA 91330, USA. Tel 818-677-7575, fax 818-677-3207. paula.thomson@csun.edu  
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  ISSN 0885-1158 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:26395617 Approved no  
  Call Number UU @ jana.mullerova @ Serial 42173  
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Author Chiolerio, A.; Bocchini, S.; Scaravaggi, F.; Porro, S.; Perrone, D.; Beretta, D.; Caironi, M.; Fabrizio Pirri, C. url  openurl
  Title Synthesis of polyaniline-based inks for inkjet printed devices: Electrical characterization highlighting the effect of primary and secondary doping Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Semiconductor Science and Technology  
  Volume (down) 30 Issue 10 Pages  
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  Notes Cited By :4; Export Date: 2 November 2016 Approved no  
  Call Number IIT-CSF @ alessandro.chiolerio @ Serial 42777  
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Author Akchurin, O.; Reidy, K.J. url  openurl
  Title Genetic causes of proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome: impact on podocyte pathobiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Pediatr Nephrol  
  Volume (down) 30 Issue 2 Pages 221-233  
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  Abstract In the past 20 years, multiple genetic mutations have been identified in patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS) and both familial and sporadic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Characterization of the genetic basis of CNS and FSGS has led to the recognition of the importance of podocyte injury to the development of glomerulosclerosis. Genetic mutations induce injury due to effects on the podocyte’s structure, actin cytoskeleton, calcium signaling, and lysosomal and mitochondrial function. Transgenic animal studies have contributed to our understanding of podocyte pathobiology. Podocyte endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell polarity, and autophagy play a role in maintenance of podocyte health. Further investigations related to the effects of genetic mutations on podocytes may identify new pathways for targeting therapeutics for nephrotic syndrome.  
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  ISSN 0931-041x ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45820  
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Author Ariceta, G.; Lara, E.; Camacho, J.A.; Oppenheimer, F.; Vara, J.; Santos, F.; Muñoz, M.A.; Cantarell, C.; Gil Calvo, M.; Romero, R.; Valenciano, B.; García-Nieto, V.; Sanahuja, M.J.; Crespo, J.; Justa, M.L.; Urisarri, A.; Bedoya, R.; Bueno, A.; Daza, A.; Bravo, J.; Llamas, F.; Jiménez Del Cerro, L.A. url  openurl
  Title Cysteamine (Cystagon®) adherence in patients with cystinosis in Spain: successful in children and a challenge in adolescents and adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Nephrol Dial Transplant  
  Volume (down) 30 Issue 3 Pages 475-480  
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  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cysteamine has improved survival and prognosis in cystinosis. Increasing numbers of patients reach adulthood and face new challenges such as compliance that wanes over time. The aim of this study was to evaluate adherence to cysteamine treatment in a group of cystinotic patients in Spain in an attempt to identify potential therapy pitfalls and improve the overall care of affected individuals. Despite the impact of cysteamine on prognosis, there is a paucity of data regarding adherence. METHOD: Thirty-four cystinotic patients (21 male) 38% ≥18 years were enrolled in a voluntary, anonymous survey. Replies were obtained from patients (15/34), mothers (11/34), fathers (4/34) and both parents (4/34). RESULTS: Patient age (median and interquartile range) at diagnosis was 1 year (0.57-1), and patient age at Cystagon® initiation was also 1 year (0.8-1.8). Sixteen (47%) were kidney transplant (KTx) recipients; six were retransplanted. Age at first KTx 10 years (8.7-13.7). Patient understanding of multiorgan involvement in cystinosis: 4.1 organs reported; eye 97% and kidney 91%. Cysteamine was given by mother (100%) and father (83%) in <11 year olds, or self-administered (94%) in ≥11 year olds. Four daily doses in 89% versus 56% in <11 year olds or ≥11 year olds, with fixed schedule in 94% versus 50% in <11 or ≥11 year olds and progressive loss of reminders over time. Furthermore, 44% complained of unpleasant smell. Motivation for treatment compliance was 100% versus 40% in <11 versus ≥11 year olds, respectively. Disease impact in patients <18 years is as follows: school (29%), social (14%), ‘feeling different’ (10%); in patients ≥18 years: ‘feeling different’ (62%), professional (39%) and job absenteeism (31%). Referring physician: paediatric nephrologist (94%) and nephrologist (63%) in <11 versus ≥11 year olds. Ophthalmological follow-up: 83% versus 38% in <11 versus ≥11 year olds. Patient opinion of physician expertise: paediatric nephrologist (94%) and nephrologist (44%). New treatment options (65%) and better information (42%) were demanded to improve adherence. CONCLUSION: Treatment with Cystagon is effective in young patients. However, adherence diminishes over time in adolescents and adults despite disease impact. Strategies such as better information on the disease, patient self-care promotion and facilitated transition to adult healthcare services are required to improve compliance and the clinical management of cystinosis.  
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  ISSN 0931-0509 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45856  
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Author Aiff, H.; Attman, P.O.; Aurell, M.; Bendz, H.; Ramsauer, B.; Schön, S.; Svedlund, J. url  openurl
  Title Effects of 10 to 30 years of lithium treatment on kidney function Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Psychopharmacol  
  Volume (down) 29 Issue 5 Pages 608-614  
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  Abstract Long-term lithium treatment is associated with end-stage renal disease, but there is little evidence of a clinically significant reduction in renal function in most patients. We previously found that 1.5% of people who took lithium from the 1960s and 1970s developed end-stage renal disease; however, none of the patients who started after 1980 had end-stage renal disease. Here we aimed to study the prevalence and extent of kidney damage during the course of long-term lithium treatment since 1980. We retrieved serum lithium and creatinine levels from 4879 patients examined between 1 January 1981 and 31 December 2010. Only patients who started their lithium treatment during the study period and had at least 10 years of cumulative treatment were included. The study group comprised 630 adult patients (402 women and 228 men) with normal creatinine levels at the start of lithium treatment. There was a yearly increase in median serum creatinine levels already from the first year of treatment. About one-third of the patients who had taken lithium for 10-29 years had evidence of chronic renal failure but only 5% were in the severe or very severe category. The results indicate that a substantial proportion of adult patients who are treated with lithium for more than a decade develop signs of renal functional impairment, also when treated according to modern therapeutic principles. Our results emphasise that lithium treatment requires continuous monitoring of kidney function.  
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  ISSN 0269-8811 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45943  
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Author Andrade-Oliveira, V.; Amano, M.T.; Correa-Costa, M.; Castoldi, A.; Felizardo, R.J.; de Almeida, D.C.; Bassi, E.J.; Moraes-Vieira, P.M.; Hiyane, M.I.; Rodas, A.C.; Peron, J.P.; Aguiar, C.F.; Reis, M.A.; Ribeiro, W.R.; Valduga, C.J.; Curi, R.; Vinolo, M.A.; Ferreira, C.M.; Câmara, N.O. url  openurl
  Title Gut Bacteria Products Prevent AKI Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal J Am Soc Nephrol  
  Volume (down) 26 Issue 8 Pages 1877-1888  
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  Abstract Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are fermentation end products produced by the intestinal microbiota and have anti-inflammatory and histone deacetylase-inhibiting properties. Recently, a dual relationship between the intestine and kidneys has been unraveled. Therefore, we evaluated the role of SCFA in an AKI model in which the inflammatory process has a detrimental role. We observed that therapy with the three main SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) improved renal dysfunction caused by injury. This protection was associated with low levels of local and systemic inflammation, oxidative cellular stress, cell infiltration/activation, and apoptosis. However, it was also associated with an increase in autophagy. Moreover, SCFAs inhibited histone deacetylase activity and modulated the expression levels of enzymes involved in chromatin modification. In vitro analyses showed that SCFAs modulated the inflammatory process, decreasing the maturation of dendritic cells and inhibiting the capacity of these cells to induce CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation. Furthermore, SCFAs ameliorated the effects of hypoxia in kidney epithelial cells by improving mitochondrial biogenesis. Notably, mice treated with acetate-producing bacteria also had better outcomes after AKI. Thus, we demonstrate that SCFAs improve organ function and viability after an injury through modulation of the inflammatory process, most likely via epigenetic modification.  
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  ISSN 1046-6673 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UofT @ mathieu.lemaire @ Serial 45839  
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Author Skirnisdottir, I.; Seidal, T.; Åkerud, H. url  openurl
  Title Differences in Clinical and Biological Features Between Type I and Type II Tumors in FIGO Stages I-II Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal Int J Gynecol Cancer  
  Volume (down) 25 Issue 7 Pages 1239-1247  
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  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare immunohistochemical profile for the apoptosis regulators p53, C-MYC, bax, PUMA, and PTEN and the cell cycle regulatory proteins p21 and p27, as well as clinical factors between types I and II tumors. METHODS: In total, 131 patients in FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stages I-II were divided into 2 groups of patients after type I tumors (n = 79) and type II tumors (n = 52). Differences in the immunohistochemical profile for the cell cycle-related proteins, detected by tissue microarrays and immune-histochemistry, were compared. For statistical tests, the Pearson χ test and the logistic regression model were used. All tests were 2-sided, and the level of statistical significance was P ≤ 0.05. RESULTS: In multivariate logistic regression analysis with recurrent disease as endpoint, FIGO stage (odds ratio [OR], 4.7), type I/II tumors (OR, 3.8), body mass index (BMI) (OR, 3.5), and p53 status (OR, 4.2) all were found to be independent predictive factors. In 2 different multivariate logistic regression analyses with type I/II tumors as endpoint, both p53p21 (OR, 2.9) and p27 status (OR, 3.0) were associated with type II tumors. Differently, C-MYC status (OR, 0.4) was associated with type I tumors. Furthermore, age (OR, 1.04), BMI (OR, 0.4), and recurrent disease (OR, 4.3) all were associated to type II tumors. In survival analysis, there was a trend (P = 0.054) toward better disease-free survival for patients with type I tumors. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant positivity for p53 and negativity for p21, positivity for p27, and negativity for C-MYC in an epithelial ovarian tumor might strengthen the diagnostic option of type II tumor ovarian carcinoma. Patients with type II tumors were older, had lower BMI, and had more often recurrent disease than patients with type I tumors.  
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  Call Number UofT @ ankit.sinha @ Serial 44930  
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